Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-77c89778f8-swr86 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-07-24T17:17:30.408Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

7 - A Danish experiment in commercial agriculture on the Gold Coast, 1788–93

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

Per Hernæs
Affiliation:
Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Robin Law
Affiliation:
Professor of African History, University of Stirling
Suzanne Schwarz
Affiliation:
Professor of History, University of Worcester
Silke Strickrodt
Affiliation:
Research Fellow in Colonial History, German Institute of Historical Research, London
Get access

Summary

Denmark was an active player in the Atlantic slave trade and responsible for the export of about 100,000 slaves from West Africa in the period 1660–1806. From the end of the seventeenth century Danish trade centred at Christiansborg Castle in Accra, and by the mid-1780s the Danes could operate from a string of forts along the coast from Accra east to the Volta and beyond: Christiansborg, Fredensborg at Ningo, Kongensten at Ada, and Prindsensten at Keta. The early 1780s had been a boom period for Danish trade, which also sustained geographical expansion of activities on the Coast. By the late 1780s the tide turned, and Danish company trade experienced severe recession. By 1792 the Danish king decreed a ban on Danish trans-Atlantic slave-trading, with effect from 1803.

In 1788, when the slave trade was on the decline and abolition was in the offing, the Danish government supported an initiative by a former ‘surgeon’ at Christiansborg, Paul Erdmann Isert. He had returned to Copenhagen with plans to establish a Danish agricultural settlement in the hilly area of the Gold Coast hinterland, plans inspired by a wish to create a viable alternative to the slave trade. With government support Isert came back to the Gold Coast and managed to establish a small settlement in Akuapem which he called Friederich-snopel. He died shortly afterwards, and the experiment never became a success although the Danes held on to the place for a number of years.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×