Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-8448b6f56d-t5pn6 Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-04-15T10:43:06.578Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

10 - Agricultural enterprise and unfree labour in nineteenth-century Angola

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2013

Roquinaldo Ferreira
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Robin Law
Affiliation:
Professor of African History, University of Stirling
Suzanne Schwarz
Affiliation:
Professor of History, University of Worcester
Silke Strickrodt
Affiliation:
Research Fellow in Colonial History, German Institute of Historical Research, London
Get access

Summary

This chapter analyses Portuguese attempts to strengthen colonial ties with Angola by promoting agricultural activities in its African colony between the 1830s and 1860s. Recently, Seymour Drescher has argued that the abolition of the slave trade was not part of British imperialist aspirations towards Africa and that the end of the slave trade did not lay the groundwork for colonial rule over Africa. While this statement might be true in the case of the British, it did not apply to another colonial power with long ties to Africa: Portugal. In the first half of the nineteenth century, as the movement to abolish the trans-Atlantic slave trade gained strength throughout the Atlantic, Portugal sought to reframe its colonial links to Angola by promoting policies aimed at shifting its economy away from the slave trade and toward legal activities such as market-oriented agriculture.

The relationship between the end of the slave trade and Portuguese colonial plans for Africa has long been debated by scholars. In the 1960s, R.J. Hammond argued that Portuguese colonialism was born out of a reflexive ideological attachment to Africa and devoid of economic interest. This stance was challenged by the Portuguese historian Valentim Alexandre, who argued that despite its failure, early Portuguese colonialism was firmly rooted in Portuguese economic interests. Recently, Alexandre's view has been rejected by João Pedro Marques, who contends that that Portugal paid little attention to its African colonies before the mid-nineteenth century.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
Print publication year: 2013

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×