Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.26 Render date: 2021-11-29T04:11:05.474Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

19 - Processes of change in cognitive therapy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

Sona Dimidjian
Affiliation:
University of Washington
Keith S. Dobson
Affiliation:
University of Calgary
Mark A. Reinecke
Affiliation:
Northwestern University Medical School, Illinois
David A. Clark
Affiliation:
University of New Brunswick
Get access

Summary

Introduction

Cognitive therapy (CT) has been applied to a diverse range of clinical problems, including depression, anxiety, eating disorders, personality disorders, addictive behaviors, and marital distress (DeRubeis et al., 2001). CT is one of the most widely studied psychotherapies, as recent decades have witnessed a proliferation of research investigating its efficacy. Outcome data attest to the efficacy of CT across the broad range of clinical problems, including those noted above.

Unfortunately, while there are many studies investigating the outcome of CT, the volume of research examining the process of change in CT has been more modest. In fact, only recently have researchers systematically begun to address questions regarding the active ingredients of CT and particular mediators or moderators of change. These areas of research, however, have profound practical and theoretical implications and will likely be an increasing focus of attention in the future. Greater knowledge about particular process variables has the potential to enhance treatment development efforts, and point the way toward interventions that are more powerful and efficient than those of today. Additionally, the impact on clinician training and the treatment and service delivery and dissemination could have significant public health relevance.

This chapter focuses on the process of change in CT. Towards this end, we first propose a basic model of therapeutic change, which we use to elucidate the particular components of the cognitive theory of clinical change. Next, we present an integrative review of the empirical literature on the process of change in CT.

Type
Chapter
Information
Cognitive Therapy across the Lifespan
Evidence and Practice
, pp. 477 - 506
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×