Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-4hcbs Total loading time: 0.288 Render date: 2021-12-06T03:09:40.412Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

9 - Cognitive therapy and the self

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

David L. Dubois
Affiliation:
University of Missouri
Cristy Lopez
Affiliation:
University of Missouri
Gilbert R. Parra
Affiliation:
University of Missouri
Mark A. Reinecke
Affiliation:
Northwestern University Medical School, Illinois
David A. Clark
Affiliation:
University of New Brunswick
Get access

Summary

Self processes have a prominent role in the conceptual foundations of cognitive therapy. Cognitive therapy is based upon a constructionist viewpoint and assumes that each individual's construal of his or her experiences constitutes a reality of primary importance for that person (Guidano and Liotti, 1985). These perceptions pertain not only to events in the external world, but also to internal attributes of the self (Beck, 1976). Self-referential thought processes accordingly have received significant attention in cognitive theories of psychopathology and treatment (Beck et al., 1990; Freeman et al., 1990; Beck, 1995; Dattilio and Reinecke, 1996; Young, 1999). It has been recommended that assessment of these types of cognitions, as distinct from those with an external orientation, be used to inform treatment planning for individual clients (Beck and Freeman, 1990; Freeman et al., 1990). Furthermore, intervention strategies directed toward changing beliefs about the self play an essential role in cognitive therapy for specific disorders (e.g., depression).

Despite these considerations, theory and research on the self currently exist as an independent literature. Whereas studies in this area have been concerned primarily with the development and testing of general conceptual models, the emphasis in the cognitive therapy literature has been on the role of self factors within an applied context (i.e., psychotherapy). Furthermore, the focus of most self research has been on nonclinical populations.

Type
Chapter
Information
Cognitive Therapy across the Lifespan
Evidence and Practice
, pp. 202 - 230
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×