Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-99c86f546-pkshj Total loading time: 0.357 Render date: 2021-12-05T20:59:30.537Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

2 - Cognitive theory and therapy of depression

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2014

Ari Solomon
Affiliation:
Stanford University Medical Center
David A. F. Haaga
Affiliation:
American University
Mark A. Reinecke
Affiliation:
Northwestern University Medical School, Illinois
David A. Clark
Affiliation:
University of New Brunswick
Get access

Summary

Cognitive theory of depression

Cognitive theory of depression (Beck, 1963) holds a prominent place in the history of clinical psychology as one of the first systematic statements of assumptions that have shaped the cognitive revolution in psychopathology (Clark and Steer, 1996). These tenets have since informed cognitive conceptualizations of many other disorders, as evidenced by the diversity of models described in this volume. Most fundamentally, all cognitive theories of psychopathology assert that people notice, recall, and interpret their experiences idiosyncratically – in accordance with their personal learning histories – and that these cognitive styles play a role in the genesis of specific psychological disorders.

There are numerous cognitive theories of depression (Ellis, 1987; Abramson et al., 1989), and a detailed description and review of each of these models and their implications for treating depression would exceed the scope of this chapter. We have elected to focus specifically on Beck's theory because more than other cognitive models it has both generated substantial empirical research on the psychopathology of depression and led to the development of an empirically supported treatment for depression (Clark et al., 1999).

In cognitive theory of depression, Beck proposed that rigidly negativistic beliefs regarding personal inadequacy or loss (e.g., “I am all alone in the world”) in combination with overvaluation of certain outcomes (e.g., “Life is not worth living if I am all alone”) are vulnerability factors for the onset and maintenance of depression.

Type
Chapter
Information
Cognitive Therapy across the Lifespan
Evidence and Practice
, pp. 12 - 39
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2003

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×