Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-2qt69 Total loading time: 0.603 Render date: 2022-08-15T10:28:40.248Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

31 - Psychiatric and neurodegenerative disease: overview

from SECTION 6 - PSYCHIATRIC AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 December 2009

Jonathan H. Gillard
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Adam D. Waldman
Affiliation:
Charing Cross Hospital, London
Peter B. Barker
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University
Get access

Summary

Introduction

The advent of neuroimaging techniques which yield physiological in addition to structural information are of particular interest in the scientific and clinical investigations of neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. These are groups of conditions where any structural changes which are evident on anatomical imaging sequences generally correlate poorly with clinical diagnostic categories, underlying pathophysiology and disease severity.

T1- and T2-dependent MR sequences which are the mainstay of routine clinical neuroimaging are frequently insensitive to the underlying pathological processes in these diseases. Focal or global atrophy due to associated neuronal loss is also frequently subtle or absent, particularly early in the course of disease.

As a result, clinical brain imaging using standard techniques is frequently normal, or non-specifically abnormal.

Physiological imaging can be considered to have two main purposes in this context: The first is clinical; to provide diagnostic information which augments that available from clinical examination, laboratory tests and conventional structural brain imaging. The aim here is to increase the sensitivity and or specificity of the imaging examination as a whole, and improve diagnostic confidence, which will ultimately guide clinical management. In this context, the technique must provide a surrogate marker of disease, which is of predictive value in diagnosis or prognosis for an individual patient. In practice, this requires a distinctive imaging appearance or, in the case of quantitative techniques, sufficient separation between parameters measured to allow an individual being examined to be placed confidently in a diagnostic or prognostic clinical group. In order to have widespread clinical impact, the technique must improve specificity, sensitivity, safety or cost-efficacy in securing a diagnosis.

Type
Chapter
Information
Clinical MR Neuroimaging
Diffusion, Perfusion and Spectroscopy
, pp. 523 - 528
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2004

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×