Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-768ffcd9cc-96qlp Total loading time: 0.268 Render date: 2022-12-06T12:14:26.858Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

8 - Summary and future research needs

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  07 September 2011

John Turner
Affiliation:
British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge
Gareth J. Marshall
Affiliation:
British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge
Get access

Summary

Introduction

In earlier chapters we have given a summary of our current understanding of past climate change at high latitudes and provided scenarios of how the climates of the two polar regions may evolve over the next century under different levels of greenhouse gas emissions. We are at a critical period in the study of the Earth's climate. Improved data sets providing insight into past climate variability are constantly appearing from new ice and ocean coring initiatives. In addition, we are getting superior observations from satellite systems that give us an unprecedented coverage of the atmospheric, oceanic and cryospheric conditions at high latitudes, which allow us to better understand the mechanisms that are important there. In recent decades our ability to model the environment of the polar regions has also improved. However, there are still many questions unanswered regarding the reasons for past and current climate change and significant doubt about what may happen over the next century.

Regarding future climate changes, perhaps the largest uncertainty is over how greenhouse gas emissions will change over the coming decades. With the release of the IPCC's Fourth Assessment Report, there has been a greater willingness to accept that human activities since the start of the Industrial Revolution, and particularly over the last 100 years, have altered the climate of the Earth.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×