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Part II - Conscience According to Major Figures and Traditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  12 June 2021

Jeffrey B. Hammond
Affiliation:
Faulkner University
Helen M. Alvare
Affiliation:
George Mason University, Virginia
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Christianity and the Laws of Conscience
An Introduction
, pp. 91 - 284
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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