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15 - Christianity and the rights of women

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2012

M. Christian Green
Affiliation:
Emory University
John Witte, Jr
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
Frank S. Alexander
Affiliation:
Emory University, Atlanta
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Summary

“Wives, be subject to your husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife as Christ is the head of the church.”

(Eph. 5:22–4)

“Let a woman learn in silence with all submissiveness. I permit no woman to teach or to have authority over men; she is to keep silent.”

(1 Tim. 2:11–12)

“There is neither Jew nor Greek; there is neither slave nor free; there is neither male nor female; for you are all one in Christ Jesus.”

(Gal. 3:27–8)

Former United States President Jimmy Carter and other members of the group of political and religious leaders known as “The Elders” have recently embarked on a worldwide initiative on “Equality for Women and Girls.” Grounded in the language of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights – particularly the guarantee, “Everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth in this Declaration, without distinction of any kind, such as race, color, sex, language, religion, political or other opinion, national or social origin, property, birth or other status,” as well as such subsequent international conventions as the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) – the Elders have called for religious leaders, in particular, to examine their own records when it comes to the rights of women and girls. As the mission statement for the initiative proclaims, “Religion and tradition are a great force for peace and progress around the world.

Type
Chapter
Information
Christianity and Human Rights
An Introduction
, pp. 302 - 319
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

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References

Pisan, Christine, The Vision of Christine de Pizan, trans. McLeod, Glenda and Willard, Charity Cannon (Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2005)Google Scholar
Ulrich, Laurel Thatcher, Well-Behaved Women Seldom Make History (New York: Knopf, 2007)Google Scholar
Birk, Bonnie A., Christine de Pisan and Biblical Wisdom: A Feminist-Theological Point of View (Milwaukee, WI: Marquette University Press, 2005)Google Scholar
McGrady, Deborah L. and Altmann, Barbara K., eds., Christine de Pisan: A Casebook (New York: Routledge, 2003)Google Scholar
James, Regina, “Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary, or, Mary Astell and Mary Wollstonecraft Compared,” Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture 5 (1976): 121–39Google Scholar
Gordan, Lyndall, Vindication: A Life of Mary Wollstonecraft (New York: HarperCollins, 2005)Google Scholar
Jacobs, Diane, Her Own Woman: The Life of Mary Wollstonecraft (New York: Simon and Schuster, 2001)Google Scholar
Todd, Janet, Mary Wollstonecraft: A Revolutionary Life (New York: Columbia University Press, 2000)Google Scholar

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