Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-2c279 Total loading time: 0.57 Render date: 2023-01-27T19:14:32.603Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

2.2 - Platonism and Christianity in Late Antiquity

from II - History

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2021

Alexander J. B. Hampton
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
John Peter Kenney
Affiliation:
Saint Michael's College, Vermont
Get access

Summary

The relation of early Christianity to ancient Platonism has been a conflicted issue in historical scholarship, bringing to the fore latent questions about the nature of philosophy and shape of Christian theology. This chapter is intended to build upon recent advances in the scholarly interpretation of both Platonism and Early Christianity, in order to disentangle some long-standing interpretive issues. It emphasizes the role of Platonism and Christianity in the emergence of monotheism in late antiquity and the importance of Platonism in the development of the philosophical idea of transcendence.

Type
Chapter
Information
Christian Platonism
A History
, pp. 162 - 182
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Bigg, Charles. The Christian Platonists of Alexandria. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1913.Google Scholar
Blosser, Benjamin P. Become Like the Angels: Origen’s Doctrine of the Soul. Washington, D.C.: Catholic University of America Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Chadwick, Henry.Origen.” In Cambridge History of Later Greek and Early Medieval Philosophy, edited by Armstrong, A. H., 182–192. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Dillon, John. The Middle Platonists. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1977.Google Scholar
Edwards, M. J. Origen against Plato. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2002.Google Scholar
Gerson, Lloyd, ed. The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Hadot, Pierre. Philosophy as a Way of Life. Malden, MA: Blackwell, 1995.Google Scholar
Hägg, H. F. Clement of Alexandria and the Beginnings of Christian Apophaticism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harnack, Adolf. History of Dogma. Translated by Neil Buchanan. London: Williams and Norgate, 1897.Google Scholar
Hengel, Martin. Jews, Greeks and Barbarians. Philadelphia: Fortress Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Kamesar, Adam, ed. The Cambridge Companion to Philo. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenney, J. P.Ancient Apophatic Theology,” In Gnosticism and Later Platonism. Themes, Figures, and Texts, edited by Turner, John D. and Majercik, Ruth, 259275. Atlanta: SBL Symposium Series 12, 2000.Google Scholar
Kenney, J. P. Contemplation and Classical Christianity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.Google Scholar
Kenney, J. P. Mystical Monotheism: A Study in Ancient Platonic Theology. Hanover and London: Brown University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Kenney, J. P. The Mysticism of Saint Augustine: Rereading the Confessions. London: Routledge, 2005.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kenney, J. P.The Platonism of the Tripartite Tractate.” In Neoplatonism and Gnosticism, edited by Wallis, R. T. and Bregman, J., 187206. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, Karen L. The Secret Revelation of John. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, Karen L. What is Gnosticism? Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Koester, Helmut. History, Culture, and Religion of the Hellenistic Age. Introduction to the New Testament. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter, 1995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewis, Thomas A. Why Philosophy Matters for the Study of Religion & Vice Versa. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lilla, S. Clement of Alexandria: A Study in Christian Platonism. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1971.Google Scholar
Louth, Andrew. Denys the Areopagite. London: Continuum, 1993.Google Scholar
Martens, Peter W. Origen and Scripture: The Contours of the Exegetical Life. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Meredith, Andrew.Gregory of Nyssa.” In The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, edited by Gerson, Lloyd, vol. I, 471481. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Minns, Denis.Justin Martyr.” In The Cambridge History of Philosophy in Late Antiquity, edited by Gerson, Lloyd, 261–267. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Perl, Eric. Theophany: The Neoplatonic Philosophy of Dionysius the Areopagite. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2008.Google Scholar
Radde-Gallwitz, Andrew. Basil of Caesarea, Gregory of Nyssa, and the Transformation of Divine Simplicity. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Radde-Gallwitz, Andrew. Gregory of Nyssa’s Doctrinal Works: A Literary Study. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rorem, Paul. Pseudo-Dionysius. A Commentary on the Texts and an Introduction to Their Influence. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Runia, David T. Philo in Early Christian Literature: A Survey. Assen: Van Gorcum, 1993.Google Scholar
Scott, Mark S. M. Journey Back to God: Origen on the Problem of Evil. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shaw, Gregory. Theurgy and the Soul: The Neoplatonism of Iamblichus. University Park, PA: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1995.Google Scholar
Stead, Christopher. Divine Substance. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1977.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×