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1.6 - Participation: Aquinas and His Neoplatonic Sources

from I - Concepts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 January 2021

Alexander J. B. Hampton
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
John Peter Kenney
Affiliation:
Saint Michael's College, Vermont
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Summary

This essay treats of the (Neo)platonic influences in the thought of Thomas Aquinas, in particular the notion of participation. It describes Aquinas’ doctrine of participation in being as developed from his principal Neoplatonic sources, to wit, Boethius’ De hebdomadibus, Dionysius’ De divinis nominibus, and the Liber de causis. It argues that the doctrine of creation in terms of participation the Christian conditions of creation.

Type
Chapter
Information
Christian Platonism
A History
, pp. 122 - 140
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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