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Appendices

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 June 2016

Jan-Willem van Prooijen
Affiliation:
VU University Amsterdam
Paul A. M. van Lange
Affiliation:
VU University Amsterdam
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Summary

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Chapter
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Cheating, Corruption, and Concealment
The Roots of Dishonesty
, pp. 303 - 310
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

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