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Chapter 18 - Other clinical manifestations of cerebralmicrobleeds

from Section 3 - Microbleeds in relation to specific populations, diseases and neurological symptoms

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2011

David J. Werring
Affiliation:
Institute of Neurology, London
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Summary

This chapter considers the potential mechanisms by which cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) could cause or be associated with neurological dysfunction. It then focuses on CMBs in relation to transient neurological symptoms (mainly in the context of cerebral amyloid angiopathy [CAA]) and briefly discusses their association with disability and mortality. A fundamental challenge in studying how CMBs could affect brain function is that they are closely linked to many clinical and imaging manifestations of cerebrovascular disease, including all types of ischemic stroke and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In patients with transient neurological symptoms related to CAA, a seizure-like mechanism may be particularly likely when the symptoms are stereotypical, spread to contiguous cortical regions or resolve with anticonvulsant drugs. The accumulation of CMBs might reflect progressive small vessel pathology and so could result in the development of progressive disability or even be associated with an increased risk of death.
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Cerebral Microbleeds
Pathophysiology to Clinical Practice
, pp. 159 - 164
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

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