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Chapter 20 - Airway management in cervical spine injury

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2015

Lauren C. Berkow
Affiliation:
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
John C. Sakles
Affiliation:
University of Arizona College of Medicine
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

Hassid, VJ, Schinco, MA, Tepas, JJ, et al. Definitive establishment of airway control is critical for optimal outcome in lower cervical spinal cord injury. J Trauma 2008; 65: 1328–32.Google ScholarPubMed
Malik, SA, Murphy, M, Connolly, P, O’Byrne, J. Evaluation of morbidity, mortality and outcome following cervical spine injuries in elderly patients. Eur Spine J 2008; 17: 585–91.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fujii, T, Faul, M, Sasser, S. Risk factors for cervical spine injury among patients with traumatic brain injury. J Emerg Trauma Shock 2013; 6: 252–8.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prasarn, ML, Horodyski, M, Scott, NE, et al. Motion generated in the unstable upper cervical spine during head tilt–chin lift and jaw thrust maneuvers. Spine J 2014; 14: 609–14.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shatney, CH, Brunner, RD, Nguyen, TQ. The safety of orotracheal intubation in patients with unstable cervical spine fracture or high spinal cord injury. Am J Surg 1995; 170: 676–9; discussion 679–80.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Thiboutot, F, Nicole, PC, Trépanier, CA, Turgeon, AF, Lessard, MR. Effect of manual in-line stabilization of the cervical spine in adults on the rate of difficult orotracheal intubation by direct laryngoscopy: a randomized controlled trial. Can J Anaesth 2009; 56: 412–18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wendling, AL, Tighe, PJ, Conrad, BP, et al. A comparison of 4 airway devices on cervical spine alignment in cadaver models of global ligamentous instability at C1–2. Anesth Analg 2013; 117: 126–32.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
LeGrand, SA, Hindman, BJ, Dexter, F, Weeks, JB, Todd, MM. Craniocervical motion during direct laryngoscopy and orotracheal intubation with the Macintosh and Miller blades: an in vivo cinefluoroscopic study. Anesthesiology 2007; 107: 884–91.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lennarson, PJ, Smith, D, Todd, MM, et al. Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization. J Neurosurg 2000; 92: 201–6.Google ScholarPubMed
Martyn, JA, Richtsfeld, M. Succinylcholine-induced hyperkalemia in acquired pathologic states: etiologic factors and molecular mechanisms. Anesthesiology 2006; 104: 158–69.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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