Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-ms7nj Total loading time: 0.76 Render date: 2022-08-14T19:48:44.456Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Book contents

Case 31 - Woman with gait impairment and difficulty reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  16 May 2011

Serge Gauthier
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Pedro Rosa-Neto
Affiliation:
McGill University, Montréal
Get access

Summary

This chapter speaks about a 75-year-old woman admitted with a 4-year history of progressive social withdrawal, decreased fluency, and difficulty handling complex tasks. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain showed prominent mesencephalic atrophy, dilation of the third ventricle, and mild cerebral atrophy. Based upon her history and examination, the patient met National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke - Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (NINDS-SPSP) diagnostic criteria for probable Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Available data showed that the diagnosis of PSP was pathologically confirmed in essentially 100% of patients who meet these criteria. The patient's motor function progressively worsened, and she died from respiratory complications, approximately 6 years following symptom onset. Progressive supranuclear palsy is a sporadic neurodegenerative disease, which is defined clinicopathologically by the constellation of atypical parkinsonism, supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, and a characteristic pattern of tau accumulation within the brainstem and basal ganglia.
Type
Chapter
Information
Case Studies in Dementia
Common and Uncommon Presentations
, pp. 229 - 237
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2011

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×