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Introduction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 January 2022

James Stafford
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
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Summary

Histories of Irish political thought in this period have adopted an overwhelmingly national focus. While they have frequently engaged with the transnational contexts, whether British, Atlantic or European, that have shaped traditions such as unionism, nationalism and republicanism, their ultimate purpose has been to better understand the principal actors in what remains an Irish story. 4 This focus on Irish national and confessional identities has tended to sideline other questions that we might usefully ask of texts produced in and around Ireland during this turbulent period. Where was Ireland located, by Irish and non-Irish contemporaries alike, within the broader political conjuncture of the later-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries? What can debates concerning Ireland can tell us about the evolution of British and European political thinking in the era of the American and French Revolutions, and of Britain’s rise to global commercial and colonial hegemony?

Type
Chapter
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The Case of Ireland
Commerce, Empire and the European Order, 1750–1848
, pp. 1 - 22
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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  • Introduction
  • James Stafford, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Case of Ireland
  • Online publication: 27 January 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009031905.001
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To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Introduction
  • James Stafford, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Case of Ireland
  • Online publication: 27 January 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009031905.001
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Introduction
  • James Stafford, Columbia University, New York
  • Book: The Case of Ireland
  • Online publication: 27 January 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781009031905.001
Available formats
×