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9 - Care and Support for Adults in England

Background and the Recent Care Act Reforms

from Part III - Care and Support Policy Tensions in Two Liberal Welfare States

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 April 2022

Yvette Maker
Affiliation:
University of Melbourne
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Summary

This chapter introduces the second case study analysis, which explores the manifestation of the two care policy tensions, and the potential application of the care and support rights principles, in a different context. It is focused on England’s Care Act, which introduced fundamental changes to the form and purpose of care and support policy, also referred to as ‘adult social care’. The Care Act makes provision for some people with disabilities – and other adults with care and support needs – as well as some carers to access personal budgets for the purchase of services to meet their needs and promote their ‘well-being’. It contemplates recipients’ participation in a range of activities (including unpaid care and paid work) and applies to multiple constituencies and thus appears – at least on the surface – to be more closely aligned with the care and support rights principles than the Australian policy discussed in earlier chapters. This chapter outlines the history and key features of care and support policy in England and sets out the eligibility criteria that care and support users and carers must meet in order to qualify for support.

Type
Chapter
Information
Care and Support Rights After Neoliberalism
Balancing Competing Claims Through Policy and Law
, pp. 196 - 214
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

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