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Chapter 6 - Metabolic management during cardiopulmonary bypass

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2015

Sunit Ghosh
Affiliation:
Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Florian Falter
Affiliation:
Papworth Hospital, Cambridge
Albert C. Perrino, Jr
Affiliation:
Yale University, Connecticut
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

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References

Suggested Further Reading

Butterworth, J, Wagenknecht, LE, Legault, C, et al. Attempted control of hyperglycemia during cardiopulmonary bypass fails to improve neurologic or neurobehavioral outcomes in patients without diabetes mellitus undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 2005; 130: 1319.Google Scholar
Gandhi, GY, Nuttall, GA, Abel, MD, et al. Intensive intraoperative insulin therapy versus conventional glucose management during cardiac surgery: a randomized trial. Ann Intern Med 2007; 146: 233–43.Google Scholar
Gravlee, GP, Davis, RF, Stammers, AH, Ungerleider, R, eds. Cardiopulmonary Bypass: Principles and Practice, 3rd ed. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health/Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2008.Google Scholar
Grigore, AM, Grocott, HP, Mathew, JP, et al. The re-warming rate and increased peak temperature alter neurocognitive outcome after cardiac surgery. Anesth Analg 2002; 94: 410.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grocott, HP, Mackensen, GB, Grigore, AM, et al. Postoperative hyperthermia is associated with cognitive dysfunction after coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Stroke 2002; 33: 537–41.Google Scholar
Mackensen, GB, Grocott, HP, Newman, MF. Cardiopulmonary bypass and the brain. In Kay, PH, Munsch, CM, eds. Techniques in Extracorporeal Circulation, 4th ed. London: Oxford University Press; 2004: 148–76.Google Scholar
McAlister, FA, Man, J, Bistritz, L, et al. Diabetes and coronary artery bypass surgery: an examination of perioperative glycemic control and outcomes. Diabetes Care 2003; 26: 1518–24.Google Scholar
Puskas, F, Grocott, H, White, W, et al. Intraoperative hyperglycemia and cognitive decline after CABG. Ann Thorac Surg 2007; 84: 1467–73.Google Scholar
Reed, CC, Stafford, TB. Cardiopulmonary Bypass, 2nd ed. Houston: Texas Medical Press; 1985.Google Scholar
Watkins, JG. Arterial Blood Gases: A Self-Study Manual. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 1985.Google Scholar
Turer, AT, Stevens, RD, Bain, JR, et al. Metabolomic profiling reveals distinct patterns of myocardial substrate use in humans with coronary artery disease or left ventricular dysfunction during surgical ischemia/reperfusion. Circulation 2009; 119(13): 1736–46.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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