Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-lgdn2 Total loading time: 0.757 Render date: 2021-10-26T06:27:59.572Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Book contents

56 - Introduction: nation building, literary culture, and language

from Part V - The modern period (1868 to present)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 January 2016

Haruo Shirane
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Tomi Suzuki
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
David Lurie
Affiliation:
Columbia University, New York
Get access

Summary

This introduction focuses on the long three decades, from the early 1870s to the turn of the century, paying particular attention to major developments in media, journalism, the educational system, literacy, and practices of writing and reading in the larger sociopolitical context. Toward the end of 1873, a group of leading scholars and intellectuals, who played important roles in Meiji nation building as government officials, and who shared similar concerns with Fukuzawa Yukichi. The oligarchic government aggressively promoted a policy of "developing national prosperity and military strength" after leading members of the early Meiji government came back from an eighteen-month embassy to the United States and Europe, where they witnessed first-hand the modern system of industrial capitalism and its infrastructure. From the early 1900s, after Japan's victory in the Russo-Japanese War, the phonocentric ideology of the national language emerged as the core of systematic national language policy, in which the differences between the spoken and written languages were ideologically suppressed.
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2015

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
1
Cited by

Send book to Kindle

To send this book to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Send book to Dropbox

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Send book to Google Drive

To send content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×