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Bibliography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 December 2017

Brendan Smith
Affiliation:
University of Bristol
Thomas Bartlett
Affiliation:
University of Aberdeen
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Print publication year: 2018

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References

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Brown, M., Disunited Kingdoms: Peoples and Politics in the British Isles 1280–1460 (Harlow: Pearson, 2013).Google Scholar
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Byrne, F. J., ‘The Viking Age’, in NHI i, 609–34.Google Scholar
Byrne, F. J., ‘Ireland before the Battle of Clontarf’, in NHI i, 852–9.Google Scholar
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Cosgrove, A., ‘Ireland’, in NCMH, vii, 496–513.Google Scholar
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Fossier, R. (ed.), The Cambridge Illustrated History of the Middle Ages. 3 vols. (Cambridge University Press, 1986–97).Google Scholar
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Hammond, M., ‘Domination and Conquest?: The Scottish Experience in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries’, in Duffy and Foran (eds.), English Isles, 68–83.Google Scholar
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