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7 - Changes in the Legal Landscape

from Part II - What Has Changed?

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 April 2020

Brian J. Hoffman
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
Mindy K. Shoss
Affiliation:
University of Central Florida
Lauren A. Wegman
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
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Summary

The changing nature of work offers both opportunities and challenges for organizations. Among those challenges are issues related to maintaining compliance with labor and employment legal obligations. As work, and the workforce, changes, traditional strategies for maintaining compliance may no longer meet organizational needs and legal requirements. In this chapter, we highlight several areas in which the changing nature of work, the workforce, and the legal landscape may pose legal challenges for organizations going forward. We focus on four primary areas: (1) the classification of workers as “employees” versus “independent contractors,” (2) the occurrence of off-the-clock work, (3) pay equity, and (4) applications of big data for solving human capital problems. The chapter provides a brief background of the relevant legal standards, after which we address each of the four topic areas.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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