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24 - The Politics of Representing the Past: Symbolic Spaces of Positioning and Irony

from Part VI - Practices and Artifacts for Imagining Identity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2018

Alberto Rosa
Affiliation:
Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Jaan Valsiner
Affiliation:
Aalborg University, Denmark
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2018

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References

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Further Reading

Bartlett, F. C. (1940). Political Propaganda. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
Tripp, C. (2013). The Power and the People: Paths of Resistance in the Middle East. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar

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