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3 - Connecting Human Rights and Psychological Ethics in a Globalizing World

Issues and Recommendations

from Part I - History of Human Rights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 October 2020

Neal S. Rubin
Affiliation:
Adler University
Roseanne L. Flores
Affiliation:
Hunter College, City University of New York
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Summary

This chapter has two primary purposes. The first is to address the question of whether the psychology community has a responsibility to promote and protect human rights and, if so, what this means for psychology and for psychologists in the context of an increasingly globalizing world. The second is to examine how psychological ethics can support human rights in psychology and help further the promotion of human rights for the benefit of humanity. The chapter opens with a brief history of the origins and development of psychological ethics and human rights, and the implications of these histories for their contemporary meanings. Then, using the Universal Declaration of Ethical Principles for Psychologists and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as the primary references, the ways in which psychological ethics and human rights complement and differ from each other are examined. The chapter ends with a series of recommendations for the integration of human rights into psychological ethics and for psychology’s involvement in the protection and promotion of human rights. The recommendations emphasize the importance of enlightened globalization, as well as the importance of psychology and the human rights movement working together to serve humanity.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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