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11c - An Agreeable Response to Questions and Criticisms: Author Rejoinder to Commentaries on an Integrative Biobehavioral Trait Perspective on Antisocial Personality Disorder and Psychopathy

from Part III - Individual Disorders and Clusters

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 February 2020

Carl W. Lejuez
Affiliation:
University of Kansas
Kim L. Gratz
Affiliation:
University of Toledo, Ohio
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Summary

In addressing questions posed by Marcus and Nagel, the authors call attention to the variegated nature of psychopathy, highlighting its symptom subdimensions and differing manifest expressions (variants/subtypes). They discuss how the constructs of the triarchic model can be viewed both as phenotypic characteristics and as biobehavioral dispositions, and consider how these alternative perspectives can be helpful for clarifying what psychopathy “is” and “how” it develops. In responding to Lynam, they consider the sources of his criticisms as well as their content – focusing in particular on his preference for the five-factor trait model (FFM) as a descriptive framework, and the priority he places on psychopathy in its aggressive-criminal form. The authors discuss how the triarchic model complements the FFM descriptive approach through its emphasis on biobehavioral systems/processes and its ability to account for other variants of psychopathy.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

Drislane, L. E., Brislin, S. J., Jones, S., & Patrick, C. J. (2018). Interfacing five-factor model and triarchic conceptualizations of psychopathy. Psychological Assessment, 30(6), 834840.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Patrick, C. J. (2018). Handbook of Psychopathy (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.Google Scholar
Patrick, C. J., Iacono, W. G., & Venables, N. C. (2019). Incorporating neurophysiological measures into clinical assessments: Fundamental challenges and a strategy for addressing them. Psychological Assessment. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1037/pas0000713CrossRef
Poy, R., Segarra, P., Esteller, À., López, R., & Moltó, J. (2014). FFM description of the triarchic conceptualization of psychopathy in men and women. Psychological Assessment, 26, 6976.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

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