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Part II - Theoretical Foundations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2021

Richard E. Mayer
Affiliation:
University of California, Santa Barbara
Logan Fiorella
Affiliation:
University of Georgia
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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