Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-59b7f5684b-vcb8f Total loading time: 4.001 Render date: 2022-10-05T22:58:55.915Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "displayNetworkTab": true, "displayNetworkMapGraph": true, "useSa": true } hasContentIssue true

Part II - Applications to Health, Law, and Pornography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 June 2022

Todd K. Shackelford
Affiliation:
Oakland University, Michigan
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2022

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

References

Aktipis, A. (2020). The cheating cell: How evolution helps us understand and treat cancer. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Almeling, R. (2020). Guynecology: The missing science of men’s reproductive health. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
Alvarado, L. C. (2013). Do evolutionary life‐history trade‐offs influence prostate cancer risk? A review of population variation in testosterone levels and prostate cancer disparities. Evolutionary Applications, 6(1), 117133.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Anaissie, J., DeLay, K. J., Wang, W., Hatzichristodoulou, G., & Hellstrom, W. J. (2017). Testosterone deficiency in adults and corresponding treatment patterns across the globe. Translational Andrology and Urology, 6(2), 183.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Araujo, A. B., Mohr, B. A., & McKinlay, J. B. (2004). Changes in sexual function in middle‐aged and older men: Longitudinal data from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 52(9), 15021509.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bailey, R. C., Moses, S., Parker, C. B., Agot, K., Maclean, I., Krieger, J. N., … & Ndinya-Achola, J. O. (2007). Male circumcision for HIV prevention in young men in Kisumu, Kenya: A randomised controlled trial. The Lancet, 369(9562), 643656.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baker, R. R., & Bellis, M. A. (1993). Human sperm competition: Ejaculate adjustment by males and the function of masturbation. Animal Behaviour, 46(5), 861885.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Balasubramanian, A., Yu, J., Srivatsav, A., Spitz, A., Eisenberg, M. L., Thirumavalavan, N., … & Pastuszak, A. W. (2020). A review of the evolving landscape between the consumer internet and men’s health. Translational Andrology and Urology, 9(Suppl 2), S123.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bartlett, E. E. (2004). The effects of fatherhood on the health of men: A review of the literature. Journal of Men’s Health and Gender, 1(2–3), 159169.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bellows-Riecken, K. H., & Rhodes, R. E. (2008). A birth of inactivity? A review of physical activity and parenthood. Preventive Medicine, 46(2), 99110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beutel, M. E., Burghardt, J., Tibubos, A. N., Klein, E. M., Schmutzer, G., & Brähler, E. (2018). Declining sexual activity and desire in men – findings from representative German surveys, 2005 and 2016. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 15(5), 750756.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beutel, M. E., Schumacher, J., Weidner, W., & Brähler, E. (2002). Sexual activity, sexual and partnership satisfaction in ageing men – results from a German representative community study. Andrologia, 34(1), 2228.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bhasin, S., Brito, J. P., Cunningham, G. R., Hayes, F. J., Hodis, H. N., Matsumoto, A. M., … & Yialamas, M. A. (2018). Testosterone therapy in men with hypogonadism: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 103(5), 17151744.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Boyle, G. J., & Hill, G. (2011). Sub-Saharan African randomised clinical trials into male circumcision and HIV transmission: Methodological, ethical and legal concerns. Journal of Law and Medicine, 19(2), 316.Google ScholarPubMed
Bribiescas, R. G. (2001). Reproductive ecology and life history of the human male. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 116(S33), 148176.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bribiescas, R. G. (2018). How men age: What evolution reveals about male health and mortality. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Bribiescas, R. G., Ellison, P. T., & Gray, P. B. (2012). Male life history, reproductive effort, and the evolution of the genus Homo: New directions and perspectives. Current Anthropology, 53(S6), S424S435.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brooks, R. C., & Garratt, M. G. (2017). Life history evolution, reproduction, and the origins of sex‐dependent aging and longevity. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1389(1), 92107.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burger, O., Lee, R., & Sear, R. (in press). Human evolutionary demography. Charlottesville, VA: Open Science Framework.Google Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (2019). Mate preferences and their behavioral manifestations. Annual Review of Psychology, 70, 77110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cameron, E. E., Sedov, I. D., & Tomfohr-Madsen, L. M. (2016). Prevalence of paternal depression in pregnancy and the postpartum: An updated meta-analysis. Journal of Affective Disorders, 206, 189203.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Case, A., & Deaton, A. (2020). Deaths of despair and the future of capitalism. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Cotman, C. W., Berchtold, N. C., & Christie, L. A. (2007). Exercise builds brain health: key roles of growth factor cascades and inflammation. Trends in Neurosciences, 30(9), 464472.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corona, G., Isidori, A. M., Buvat, J., Aversa, A., Rastrelli, G., Hackett, G., … & Maggi, M. (2014). Testosterone supplementation and sexual function: A meta-analysis study. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 11(6), 15771592.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Crimmins, E. M., Shim, H., Zhang, Y. S., & Kim, J. K. (2019). Differences between men and women in mortality and the health dimensions of the morbidity process. Clinical Chemistry, 65(1), 135145.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Darwin, C. (1871) [1981]. The descent of man, and selection in relation to sex. 1871. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Daly, M., & Wilson, M. (1988). Homicide. New York: Transaction Publishers.Google ScholarPubMed
DeLamater, J. D., & Sill, M. (2005). Sexual desire in later life. Journal of Sex Research, 42(2), 138149.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Del Giudice, M. A. R. C. O., Gangestad, S. W., & Kaplan, H. S. (2016). Life history theory and evolutionary psychology. In Buss, D. (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary psychology, 2nd ed. (pp. 127). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
Dixson, A. F. (2009). Sexual selection and the origins of human mating systems. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Dixson, A. F. (2018). Copulatory and postcopulatory sexual selection in primates. Folia Primatologica, 89(3–4), 258286.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dressler, W. W., Balieiro, M. C., & dos Santos, J. E. (2017). Cultural consonance in life goals and depressive symptoms in urban Brazil. Journal of Anthropological Research, 73(1), 4365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drozdowskyj, E. S., Castro, E. G., López, E. T., Taland, I. B., & Actis, C. C. (2020). Factors influencing couples’ sexuality in the puerperium: A systematic review. Sexual Medicine Reviews, 8(1), 3847.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dudgeon, M. R., & Inhorn, M. C. (2003). Gender, masculinity, and reproduction: Anthropological perspectives. International Journal of Men’s Health, 2, 3156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Durette, R., Marrs, C., & Gray, P. B. (2011). Fathers faring poorly: Results of an internet-based survey of fathers of young children. American Journal of Men’s Health, 5(5), 395401.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Eisenberg, D. T., & Kuzawa, C. W. (2018). The paternal age at conception effect on offspring telomere length: Mechanistic, comparative and adaptive perspectives. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 373(1741), 20160442.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Emery Thompson, M., Rosati, A. G., & Snyder-Mackler, N. (2020). Insights from evolutionarily relevant models for human ageing. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 375(1811), 20190605.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Feldman, R., Braun, K., & Champagne, F. A. (2019). The neural mechanisms and consequences of paternal caregiving. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 20(4), 205224.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Fieder, M., Huber, S., & Bookstein, F. L. (2011). Socioeconomic status, marital status and childlessness in men and women: An analysis of census data from six countries. Journal of Biosocial Science, 43(5), 619.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Frayser, S. G. (1985). Varieties of sexual experience: An anthropological perspective on human sexuality. New Haven, CT: HRAF Press.Google Scholar
Freedman, A. L. (2016). The circumcision debate: Beyond benefits and risks. Pediatrics, 137(5), e20160594.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garfield, C. F., Clark-Kauffman, E., & Davis, M. M. (2006). Fatherhood as a component of men’s health. JAMA, 296(19), 23652368.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garfield, C. F., Duncan, G., Gutina, A., Rutsohn, J., McDade, T. W., Adam, E. K., … & Chase-Lansdale, P. L. (2016). Longitudinal study of body mass index in young males and the transition to fatherhood. American Journal of Men’s Health, 10(6), NP158NP167.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Garfield, Z. H., Hubbard, R. L., & Hagen, E. H. (2019). Evolutionary models of leadership. Human Nature, 30(1), 2358.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gat, A. (2008). War in human civilization. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Geary, D. C. (2015). Evolution of vulnerability: Implications for sex differences in health and development. San Diego, CA: Academic Press.Google Scholar
Geary, D. C. (2020). Male, female: The evolution of human sex differences, 3rd ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Genesoni, L., & Tallandini, M. A. (2009). Men’s psychological transition to fatherhood: An analysis of the literature, 1989–2008. Birth, 36(4), 305318.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gettler, L. T. (2016). Becoming DADS: Considering the role of cultural context and developmental plasticity for paternal socioendocrinology. Current Anthropology, 57(S13), S38S51.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gettler, L. T., Boyette, A. H., & Rosenbaum, S. (2020). Broadening perspectives on the evolution of human paternal care and fathers’ effects on children. Annual Review of Anthropology, 49, 141160.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gettler, L. T., McDade, T. W., Agustin, S. S., Feranil, A. B., & Kuzawa, C. W. (2014). Testosterone, immune function, and life history transitions in Filipino males (Homo sapiens). International Journal of Primatology, 35(3–4), 787804.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gettler, L. T., McDade, T. W., Feranil, A. B., & Kuzawa, C. W. (2012). Prolactin, fatherhood, and reproductive behavior in human males. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 148(3), 362370.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gettler, L. T., McDade, T. W., Feranil, A. B., & Kuzawa, C. W. (2011). Longitudinal evidence that fatherhood decreases testosterone in human males. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(39), 1619416199.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gottschall, J. (2016). The professor in the cage: Why men fight and why we like to watch. New York: Penguin Books.Google Scholar
Gray, P. B., & Anderson, K. G. (2012). Fatherhood. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gray, P., & Campbell, B. (2005). Erectile dysfunction and its correlates among the Ariaal of northern Kenya. International Journal of Impotence Research, 17(5), 445449.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gray, P. B., & Crittenden, A. N. (2014). Father Darwin: Effects of children on men, viewed from an evolutionary perspective. Fathering: A Journal of Theory, Research & Practice about Men as Fathers, 12(2), 121142.Google Scholar
Gray, P. B., & Garcia, J. R. (2013). Evolution and human sexual behavior. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gray, P. B., Garcia, J. R., & Gesselman, A. N. (2019). Age-related patterns in sexual behaviors and attitudes among single US Adults: An evolutionary approach. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 13(2), 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gray, P. B., Reece, J. A., Coore-Desai, C., Dinnall-Johnson, T., Pellington, S., & Samms-Vaughan, M. (2015). Sexuality among fathers of newborns in Jamaica. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 15(1), 44.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gray, P. B., Reece, J. A., Coore-Desai, C., Dinnall-Johnson, T., Pellington, S., Bateman, A., & Samms-Vaughan, M. (2018). Patterns and predictors of depressive symptoms among Jamaican fathers of newborns. Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, 53(10), 10631070.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gray, P. B., Straftis, A. A., Bird, B. M., McHale, T. S., & Zilioli, S. (2020). Human reproductive behavior, life history, and the challenge hypothesis: A 30-year review, retrospective and future directions. Hormones and Behavior, 123, 104530.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grebe, N. M., Sarafin, R. E., Strenth, C. R., & Zilioli, S. (2019). Pair-bonding, fatherhood, and the role of testosterone: A meta-analytic review. Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews, 98, 221233.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gurven, M. D., & Lieberman, D. E. (2020). WEIRD bodies: Mismatch, medicine and missing diversity. Evolution and Human Behavior, 41(5), 330340.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hankins, C. (2007). Male circumcision: Implications for women as sexual partners and parents. Reproductive Health Matters, 15(29), 6267.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Henrich, J. (2017). The secret of our success: How culture is driving human evolution, domesticating our species, and making us smarter. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Henrich, J., & Gil-White, F. J. (2001). The evolution of prestige: Freely conferred deference as a mechanism for enhancing the benefits of cultural transmission. Evolution and Human Behavior, 22(3), 165196.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Inhorn, M. C., & Patrizio, P. (2015). Infertility around the globe: New thinking on gender, reproductive technologies and global movements in the 21st century. Human Reproduction Update, 21(4), 411426.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Irons, W. (1979). Cultural and biological success. Evolutionary Biology and Human Social Behavior: An Anthropological Perspective, 284, 302.Google Scholar
Ivanov, N., Vuong, J., & Gray, P. B. (2018). A content analysis of testosterone websites: Sex, muscle, and male age-related thematic differences. American Journal of Men’s Health, 12(2), 388397.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jawed-Wessel, S., & Sevick, E. (2017). The impact of pregnancy and childbirth on sexual behaviors: A systematic review. The Journal of Sex Research, 54(4–5), 411423.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Johnson, S. L., Dunleavy, J., Gemmell, N. J., & Nakagawa, S. (2015). Consistent age-dependent declines in human semen quality: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Ageing Research Reviews, 19, 2233.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Khan, F., Mukhtar, S., Dickinson, I. K., & Sriprasad, S. (2013). The story of the condom. Indian Journal of Urology: IJU: Journal of the Urological Society of India, 29(1), 12.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kluwer, E. S. (2010). From partnership to parenthood: A review of marital change across the transition to parenthood. Journal of Family Theory & Review, 2(2), 105125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kontula, O., & Haavio-Mannila, E. (2009). The impact of aging on human sexual activity and sexual desire. Journal of Sex Research, 46(1), 4656.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kromer, J., Hummel, T., Pietrowski, D., Giani, A. S., Sauter, J., Ehninger, G., … & Croy, I. (2016). Influence of HLA on human partnership and sexual satisfaction. Scientific Reports, 6(1), 16.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kruger, D. J., & Nesse, R. M. (2006). An evolutionary life-history framework for understanding sex differences in human mortality rates. Human Nature, 17(1), 7497.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lateef, O. M., & Akintubosun, M. O. (2020). Sleep and reproductive health. Journal of Circadian Rhythms, 18, 1.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laumann, E. O., Paik, A., & Rosen, R. C. (1999). Sexual dysfunction in the United States: Prevalence and predictors. JAMA, 281(6), 537544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, Y., Lin, H., Li, Y., & Cao, J. (2011). Association between socio-psycho-behavioral factors and male semen quality: systematic review and meta-analyses. Fertility and Sterility, 95(1), 116123.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Levay, S., Baldwin, , J., & Baldwin, , J. (2012). Human sexuality, 2nd ed. Sunderland, MA: Sinauer.Google Scholar
Lindau, S. T., Schumm, L. P., Laumann, E. O., Levinson, W., O’Muircheartaigh, C. A., & Waite, L. J. (2007). A study of sexuality and health among older adults in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 357(8), 762774.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Low, B. S. (2015). Why sex matters: A Darwinian look at human behavior – revised edition. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
Lowenstine, L. J., McManamon, R., & Terio, K. A. (2016). Comparative pathology of aging great apes: Bonobos, chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans. Veterinary Pathology, 53(2), 250276.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marmot, M. (2004). Status syndrome. Significance, 1(4), 150154.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martin, D. L., & Harrod, R. P. (2015). Bioarchaeological contributions to the study of violence. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 156, 116145.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mascaro, J. S., Hackett, P. D., & Rilling, J. K. (2013). Testicular volume is inversely correlated with nurturing-related brain activity in human fathers. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(39), 1574615751.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Muehlenbein, M. P., & Flinn, M. V. (2011). Patterns and processes of human life history evolution. In Flatt, T., & Heyland, A. (Eds.), Mechanisms of life history evolution: The genetics and physiology of life history traits and trade-offs (pp. 153168). New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Muller, M. N., & Wrangham, R. W. (Eds.) (2009). Sexual coercion in primates and humans. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nahmias, S. B., & Nahmias, D. (2011). Society, sex, and STIs: Human behavior and the evolution of sexually transmitted diseases and their agents. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1230(1), 5973.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Natterson-Horowitz, B., & Bowers, K. (2012). Zoobiquity: What animals can teach us about health and the science of healing. New York: Vintage.Google Scholar
Nesse, R. M. (2019). Good reasons for bad feelings: Insights from the frontier of evolutionary psychiatry. New York: Penguin.Google Scholar
Nunn, C., & Altizer, S. M. (2006). Infectious diseases in primates: Behavior, ecology and evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pacey, A. A. (2010). Environmental and lifestyle factors associated with sperm DNA damage. Human Fertility, 13(4), 189193.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pimenoff, V. N., Houldcroft, C. J., Rifkin, R. F., & Underdown, S. (2018). The role of aDNA in understanding the coevolutionary patterns of human sexually transmitted infections. Genes, 9(7), 317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pope, H., Pope, H. G., Phillips, K. A., & Olivardia, R. (2000). The Adonis complex: The secret crisis of male body obsession. New York: Simon and Schuster.Google Scholar
Power, M. L., & Schulkin, J. (2013). The evolution of obesity. Baltimore: JHU Press.Google Scholar
Puts, D. A. (2010). Beauty and the beast: Mechanisms of sexual selection in humans. Evolution and Human Behavior, 31(3), 157175.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Puts, D. (2016). Human sexual selection. Current Opinion in Psychology, 7, 2832.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rennó Santos, M., Testa, A., Porter, L. C., & Lynch, J. P. (2019). The contribution of age structure to the international homicide decline. PLOS ONE, 14(10), e0222996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rilling, J. K., & Mascaro, J. S. (2017). The neurobiology of fatherhood. Current Opinion in Psychology, 15, 2632.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Rosen, R. C., Seftel, A. D., Ruff, D. D., & Muram, D. (2018). A pilot study using a web survey to identify characteristics that influence hypogonadal men to initiate testosterone replacement therapy. American Journal of Men’s Health, 12(3), 567574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Saxbe, D., Corner, G. W., Khaled, M., Horton, K., Wu, B., & Khoddam, H. L. (2018). The weight of fatherhood: Identifying mechanisms to explain paternal perinatal weight gain. Health Psychology Review, 12(3), 294311.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmitt, D. P. (2005). Sociosexuality from Argentina to Zimbabwe: A 48-nation study of sex, culture, and strategies of human mating. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 28(2), 247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Segal, S. J. (2003). Under the Banyan tree: A population scientist’s odyssey. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Sermondade, N., Faure, C., Fezeu, L., Shayeb, A. G., Bonde, J. P., Jensen, T. K., … & Chavarro, J. E. (2013). BMI in relation to sperm count: an updated systematic review and collaborative meta-analysis. Human Reproduction Update, 19(3), 221231.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shackelford, T. K., Pound, N., & Goetz, A. T. (2005). Psychological and physiological adaptations to sperm competition in humans. Review of General Psychology, 9(3), 228248.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sharma, V., Le, B. V., Sheth, K. R., Zargaroff, S., Dupree, J. M., Cashy, J., & Brannigan, R. E. (2013). Vasectomy demographics and postvasectomy desire for future children: Results from a contemporary national survey. Fertility and Sterility, 99(7), 18801885.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Shenk, M. K., Towner, M. C., Kress, H. C., & Alam, N. (2013). A model comparison approach shows stronger support for economic models of fertility decline. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(20), 80458050.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shwalb, D. W., Shwalb, B. J., & Lamb, M. E. (Eds.). (2013). Fathers in cultural context. New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Snyder, P. J., Bhasin, S., Cunningham, G. R., Matsumoto, A. M., Stephens-Shields, A. J., Cauley, J. A., … & Ensrud, K. E. (2016). Effects of testosterone treatment in older men. New England Journal of Medicine, 374(7), 611624.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Snyder, P. J., Bhasin, S., Cunningham, G. R., Matsumoto, A. M., Stephens-Shields, A. J., Cauley, J. A., … & Ensrud, K. E. (2018). Lessons from the testosterone trials. Endocrine Reviews, 39(3), 369386.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Storer, T. W., Basaria, S., Traustadottir, T., Harman, S. M., Pencina, K., Li, Z., … & Huang, G. (2017). Effects of testosterone supplementation for 3 years on muscle performance and physical function in older men. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 102(2), 583593.Google ScholarPubMed
Straftis, A. A., & Gray, P. B. (2019). Sex, energy, well-being and low testosterone: An exploratory survey of US men’s experiences on prescription testosterone. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 16(18), 3261.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Stuckler, D., King, L., & McKee, M. (2009). Mass privatisation and the post-communist mortality crisis: A cross-national analysis. The Lancet, 373(9661), 399407.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stulp, G., Sear, R., & Barrett, L. (2016). The reproductive ecology of industrial societies, part I. Human Nature, 27(4), 422444.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tinbergen, N. (1963). On aims and methods of ethology. Zeitschrift für tierpsychologie, 20(4), 410433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trumble, B. C., & Finch, C. E. (2019). The exposome in human evolution: From dust to diesel. The Quarterly Review of Biology, 94(4), 333394.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Trumble, B. C., Stieglitz, J., Rodriguez, D. E., Linares, E. C., Kaplan, H. S., & Gurven, M. D. (2015). Challenging the inevitability of prostate enlargement: Low levels of benign prostatic hyperplasia among Tsimane Forager-Horticulturalists. Journals of Gerontology Series A: Biomedical Sciences and Medical Sciences, 70(10), 12621268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tuljapurkar, S. D., Puleston, C. O., & Gurven, M. D. (2007). Why men matter: Mating patterns drive evolution of human lifespan. PLOS ONE, 2(8), e785.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Von Rueden, C. R., & Jaeggi, A. V. (2016). Men’s status and reproductive success in 33 nonindustrial societies: Effects of subsistence, marriage system, and reproductive strategy. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(39), 1082410829.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Walker, R. S., & Bailey, D. H. (2013). Body counts in lowland South American violence. Evolution and Human Behavior, 34(1), 2934.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wingfield, J. C., Hegner, R. E., Dufty, A. M. Jr, & Ball, G. F. (1990). The “challenge hypothesis”: Theoretical implications for patterns of testosterone secretion, mating systems, and breeding strategies. The American Naturalist, 136(6), 829846.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organization (2020). Reproductive health in the Western Pacific. www.who.int/westernpacific/health-topics/reproductive-healthGoogle Scholar
Wynter, K., Francis, L., Fletcher, R., McBride, N., Dowse, E., Wilson, N., … & Australian Fatherhood Research Consortium. (2020). Sleep, mental health and wellbeing among fathers of infants up to one year postpartum: A scoping review. Midwifery, 88, 102738.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yang, C. F. J., Gray, P., & Pope, H. G. Jr (2005). Male body image in Taiwan versus the West: Yanggang Zhiqi meets the Adonis complex. American Journal of Psychiatry, 162(2), 263269.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Yatsenko, A. N., & Turek, P. J. (2018). Reproductive genetics and the aging male. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, 35(6), 933941.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Anderson, G., Cummings, S., Freedman, L. S., Furberg, C., Henderson, M., Johnson, S. R., … & Clark, A. (1998). Design of the Women’s Health Initiative clinical trial and observational study. The Women’s Health Initiative Study Group. Controlled Clinical Trials; 19(1), 61109.Google Scholar
Anderson, G. L., Limacher, M., Assaf, A. R., Bassford, T., Beresford, S. A., Black, H., … & Women’s Health Initiative Steering Committee (2004). Effects of conjugated equine estrogen in postmenopausal women with hysterectomy: the Women’s Health Initiative randomized controlled trial. JAMA, 291(14), 17011712.Google ScholarPubMed
Barr, S. I., Janelle, K. C., & Prior, J. C. (1995). Energy intakes are higher during the luteal-phase of ovulatory menstrual cycles. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(1), 3943.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barr, S. I., Prior, J. C., & Vigna, Y. M. (1994). Restrained eating and ovulatory disturbances: Possible implications for bone health. American Journal Clinical Nutrition, 59, 9297.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barry, J. A., Azizia, M. M., & Hardiman, P. J. (2014). Risk of endometrial, ovarian and breast cancer in women with polycystic ovary syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Human Reproduction Update, 20(5), 748758.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barth, C., Steele, C. J., Mueller, K., Rekkas, V. P., Arélin, K., Pampel, A., … & Sacher, J. (2016). In-vivo dynamics of the human hippocampus across the menstrual cycle. Scientific Reports, 6, 32833.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bedford, J. L., Prior, J. C., & Barr, S. I. (2010). A prospective exploration of cognitive dietary restraint, subclinical ovulatory disturbances, cortisol and change in bone density over two years in healthy young women. JCEM, 95(7), 32913299.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bedford, J. L., Prior, J. C., Hitchcock, C. L., & Barr, S. (2009). Detecting evidence of luteal activity by least-squares quantitative basal temperature analysis against urinary progesterone metabolites and the effect of wake-time variability. European Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology Reproductive Biology, 146(1), 7680.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beral, V. (2003). Breast cancer and hormone-replacement therapy in the Million Women Study. Lancet, 362(9382), 419427.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bhattacharya, S., Porter, M., Amalraj, E., Templeton, A., Hamilton, M., Lee, A. J., & Kurinczuk, J. J. (2009). The epidemiology of infertility in the North East of Scotland. Human Reproduction, 24(12), 30963107.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Briden, L., Shirin, S., & Prior, J. C. (2020). The central role of ovulatory disturbances in the etiology of androgenic polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) – Evidence for treatment with cyclic progesterone. Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models, 32, 7182.Google Scholar
Bullen, B. A., Skrinar, G. S., Beitins, I. Z., von Mering, G., Turnbull, B. A., & McArthur, J. W. (1985). Induction of menstrual disorders by strenuous exercise in untrained women. New England Journal of Medicine, 312, 13491353.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clarke, C. L., & Sutherland, R. L. (1990). Progestin regulation of cellular proliferation. Endocrine Reviews, 11, 266301.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cole, L. A., Ladner, D. G., & Byrn, F. W. (2009). The normal variabilities of the menstrual cycle. Fertility and Sterility, 91(2), 522527.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Courtin, A., Communal, L., Vilasco, M., Cimino, D., Mourra, N., de Bortoli, M., … & Gompel, A. (2012). Glucocorticoid receptor activity discriminates between progesterone and medroxyprogesterone acetate effects in breast cells. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 131(1), 4963.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Crawford, N. M., Pritchard, D. A., Herring, A. H., & Steiner, A. Z. (2017). Prospective evaluation of luteal phase length and natural fertility. Fertility and Sterility, 107(3), 749755.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Davis, S. R., Lambrinoudaki, I., Lumsden, M., Mishra, G. D., Pal, L., Rees, M., Santoro, N., & Simoncini, T. (2015). Menopause. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 23(1), 15004.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Finegood, D., Johnston, L., Steinberg, M., & Matteson, C. L. (2014). Complexity, systems thinking, and health behavior change. In Johnson, L., Steinberg, M., Matteson, C. L., & Deck, P. B. (Eds.), Health behavior change in populations (pp. 435539). Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press.Google Scholar
Fournier, A., Berrino, F., & Clavel-Chapelon, F. (2008). Unequal risks for breast cancer associated with different hormone replacement therapies: Results from the E3N cohort study. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 107(1), 103111.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gordon, J. L., Rubinow, D. R., Eisenlohr-Moul, T. A., Leserman, J., & Girdler, S. S. (2016). Estradiol variability, stressful life events, and the emergence of depressive symptomatology during the menopausal transition. Menopause, 23(3), 257266.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gorgels, W. J., Graaf, Y., Blankenstein, M. A., Collette, H. J., Erkelens, D. W., & Banga, J. D. (1997). Urinary sex hormone excretions in premenopausal women and coronary heart disease risk: A nested case-referent study in the DOM-cohort. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 50(3), 275281.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gracia, C. R., & Freeman, E. W. (2018). Onset of the menopause transition: The earliest signs and symptoms. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America, 45(4), 585597.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hale, G. E., Hitchcock, C. L., Williams, L. A., Vigna, Y. M., & Prior, J. C. ( 2003). Cyclicity of breast tenderness and night-time vasomotor symptoms in mid-life women: Information collected using the Daily Perimenopause Diary. Climacteric, 6(2), 128139.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hallberg, L., Hogdahl, A. M., Nillson, L., & Rybo, G. (1966). Menstrual blood loss – a population study. Variation at different ages and attempts to define normality. Acta Obstetrics and Gynecology Scandinavia, 45, 320351.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hitchcock, C. L., & Prior, J. C. (2012). Oral micronized progesterone for vasomotor symptoms in healthy postmenopausal women – a placebo-controlled randomized trial. Menopause, 19, 886893.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaplan, J. R., & Manuck, S. B. (2008). Ovarian dysfunction and the premenopausal origins of coronary heart disease. Menopause, 15(4 Pt 1), 768776.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kaufert, P. A. (1980). The perimenopausal woman and her use of health services. Maturitas, 2, 191205.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Landgren, B. H., Unden, A. L., & Diczfalusy, E. (1980). Hormonal profile of the cycle in 68 normally menstruating women. Acta Endocrinologica Copenhagen, 94, 8998.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Li, D., Hitchcock, C. L., Barr, S. I., Yu, T., & Prior, J. C. (2014). Negative spinal bone mineral density changes and subclinical ovulatory disturbances – prospective data in healthy premenopausal women with regular menstrual cycles. Epidemiologic Reviews, 36(137), 147.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liu, A. Y., Petit, M. A., & Prior, J. C. (2020). Exercise and the hypothalamus: Ovulatory adaptations. In Hackney, A. C. & Constantini, N. W. (Eds.), Endocrinology of physical activity and sport (pp. 123151). Cham: Humana Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Macbeth, A. B., Goshtasebi, A., Mercer, G. W., & Prior, J. C. (2020). Does interest in sex peak at mid-cycle in ovulatory menstrual cycles of healthy, community-dwelling women? An 11-month prospective observational study. Women’s Reproductive Health, 8(2), 7991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Malcolm, C. E., & Cumming, D. C. (2003). Does anovulation exist in eumenorrheic women? Obstetrics & Gynecology, 102(2), 317318.Google ScholarPubMed
Marjoribanks, J., Lethaby, A., & Farquhar, C. (2003). Surgery versus medical therapy for heavy menstrual bleeding. The Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews, 3, 165.Google Scholar
Mather, K. J., Norman, E. G., Prior, J. C., & Elliott, T. G. (2000). Preserved forearm endothelial responses with acute exposure to progesterone: A randomized cross-over trial of 17-b estradiol, progesterone, and 17-b estradiol with progesterone in healthy menopausal women. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 85, 46444649.Google Scholar
McCrohon, J. A., Adams, M. R., McCredie, R. J., Robinson, J., Pike, A., Abbey, M., … & Celermajer, D. S. (1996). Hormone replacement therapy is associated with improved arterial physiology in healthy post-menopausal women. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf), 45(4), 435441.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McLean, J. A., Barr, S. I., & Prior, J. C. (2001). Cognitive dietary restraint is associated with higher urinary cortisol excretion in healthy premenopausal women. American Journal Clinical Nutrition, 73, 712.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Moen, M. H., Kahn, H., Bjerve, K. S., & Halvorsen, T. B. (2004). Menometrorrhagia in the perimenopause is associated with increased serum estradiol. Maturitas, 47(2), 151155.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mohammed, H., Russell, I. A., Stark, R., Rueda, O. M., Hickey, T. E., Tarulli, G. A., … & Carroll, J. S. (2015). Progesterone receptor modulates ERα action in breast cancer. Nature, 523(7560), 313317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mountjoy, M., Sundgot-Borgen, J., Burke, L., Carter, S., Constantini, N., Lebrun, C., … & Ljungqvist, A. (2014). The IOC consensus statement: beyond the female athlete triad – relative energy deficiency in sport (RED-S). British Journal of Sports Medicine, 48(7), 491497.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Munster, K., Helm, P., & Schmidt, L. (1992). Secondary amenorrhoea: Prevalence and medical contact – a cross-sectional study from a Danish county. British Journal Obstetrics Gynaecology, 99(5), 430433.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Munster, K., Schmidt, L., & Helm, P. (1992). Length and variation in the menstrual cycle – a cross-sectional study from a Danish county. British Journal Obstetrics Gynaecology, 99(5), 422429.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Nagata, I., Kato, K., Seki, K., & Furuya, K. (1986). Ovulatory disturbances: Causative factors among Japanese student nurses in a dormitory. Journal of Adolescent Health Care, 7, 15.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nielsen, H. K., Brixen, K., Bouillon, R., & Mosekilde, L. (1990). Changes in biochemical markers of osteoblastic activity during the menstrual cycle. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 70, 14311437.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Odening, K. E., Choi, B. R., Liu, G. X., Hartmann, K., Ziv, O., Chaves, L., … & Koren, G. (2012). Estradiol promotes sudden cardiac death in transgenic long QT type 2 rabbits while progesterone is protective. Heart Rhythm, 9(5), 823832.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parfitt, A. M. (1982). The coupling of bone formation to bone resorption: A critical analysis of the concept and of its relevance to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. Metabolic Bone Disease Related Research, 4, 16.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pletzer, B., Harris, T., & Hidalgo-Lopez, E. (2018). Subcortical structural changes along the menstrual cycle: Beyond the hippocampus. Scientific Reports, 8(1), 16042.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (1987). Physical exercise and the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Baillieres Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 1, 299317.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (1989). The cultural causes of osteoporosis for women. In Kahn, S. E. (Ed.), Women, stress and coping: An interdisciplinary research workshop (pp. 1322). Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (1990). Progesterone as a bone-trophic hormone. Endocrine Reviews, 11, 386398.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (1996) Exercise-associated menstrual disturbances. In Adashi, E. Y., Rock, J. A., & Rosenwaks, Z. (Eds.), Reproductive endocrinology, surgery and technology (pp. 10771091). New York: Raven Press.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (1998). Perimenopause: The complex endocrinology of the menopausal transition. Endocrine Reviews, 19, 397428.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (2002). Premenstrual symptoms and signs. In Rabel, R. E. & Bope, E. T. (Eds.), Conn’s current therapy 2002. (pp. 10781080). New York: W. B. Saunders Company.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2005). Clearing confusion about perimenopause. British Columbia Medical Journal, 47(10), 534538.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2006). Perimenopause lost – reframing the end of menstruation. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 24 (4), 323335.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2011). Progesterone for symptomatic perimenopause treatment – progesterone politics, physiology and potential for perimenopause. Facts, Views and Visions on Obstetrics and Gynecology, 3, 109120.Google ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (2014). Progesterone within ovulatory menstrual cycles needed for cardiovascular protection – an evidence-based hypothesis. Journal of Restorative Medicine, 3, 85103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2018a). Estrogen’s storm season – stories of perimenopause (e-book), 2nd ed. Vancouver, BC: CEMCOR.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2018b). Progesterone for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis in women. Climacteric, 21, 366374.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C. (2020a). The menstrual cycle. Its biology in the context of silent ovulatory disturbances. In Ussher, J. M., Chrisler, J., & Perz, J. (Eds.), Routledge international handbook of women’s sexual and reproductive health (pp. 3954). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C. (2020b). Women’s reproductive system as balanced estradiol and progesterone actions – a revolutionary, paradigm-shifting concept in women’s health. Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models, 32, 3140.Google Scholar
Prior, J. C., Cameron, A., & Hitchcock, C. L. (2018a). Oral micronized progesterone beneficial for perimenopausal hot flushes/flashes and night sweats. Endocrine Reviews, 39(2).Google Scholar
Prior, J. C., Cameron, K., Ho Yeun, B., & Thomas, J. (1982a). Menstrual cycle changes with marathon training: Anovulation and short luteal phase. Canadian Journal of Applied Sport Science, 7, 173177.Google ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Elliott, T. G., Norman, E., Stajic, V., & Hitchcock, C. L. (2014). Progesterone therapy, endothelial function and cardiovascular risk factors: A 3-month randomized, placebo-controlled trial in healthy early postmenopausal women. PLOS ONE, 9, e84698.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Ho Yeun, B., Clement, P., Bowie, L., & Thomas, J. (1982b). Reversible luteal phase changes and infertility associated with marathon training. Lancet, 1, 269270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prior, J. C., Konishi, C., Hitchcock, C. L., Kingwell, E., Janssen, P., Cheung, A. P., … & Goshtasebi, A. (2018b). Does molimina indicate ovulation? Prospective data in a hormonally documented single-cycle in spontaneously menstruating women. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(5), 1016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Prior, J. C., Naess, M., Langhammer, A., & Forsmo, S. (2015). Ovulation prevalence in women with spontaneous normal-length menstrual cycles – a population-based cohort from HUNT3, Norway. PLOS ONE, 10(8), e0134473.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Seifert-Klauss, V. R., Giustini, D., Adachi, J. D., Kalyan, S., & Goshtasebi, A. (2017). Estrogen-progestin therapy causes a greater increase in spinal bone mineral density than estrogen therapy – a systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials with direct randomization. Journal of Musculoskeletal and Neuronal Interacts, 17(3), 146154.Google ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Vigna, Y. M., & Alojado, N. (1986). Conditioning exercise decreases premenstrual symptoms – a prospective controlled three month trial. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 55, 349355.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Vigna, Y. M., Barr, S. I., Rexworthy, C., & Lentle, B. C. (1994). Cyclic medroxyprogesterone treatment increases bone density: a controlled trial in active women with menstrual cycle disturbances. American Journal Medicine, 96, 521530.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Vigna, Y. M., Schulzer, M., Hall, J. E., & Bonen, A. (1990a). Determination of luteal phase length by quantitative basal temperature methods: validation against the midcycle LH peak. Clinical & Investigative Medicine, 13, 123131.Google ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Vigna, Y. M., Schechter, M. T., & Burgess, A. E. (1990b). Spinal bone loss and ovulatory disturbances. New England Journal of Medicine, 323, 12211227.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Prior, J. C., Vigna, Y. M., Sciarretta, D., Alojado, N., & Schulzer, M. (1987). Conditioning exercise decreases premenstrual symptoms: A prospective controlled six month trial. Fertility and Sterility, 47, 402408.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ronkainen, H. R., Pakarinen, A. J., Kirkinen, P., & Kauppila, A. (1985). Physical exercise-induced changes and season-associated differences in the pituitary-ovarian function of runners and joggers. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 60, 416422.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Santoro, N., Rosenberg, J., Adel, T., & Skurnick, J. H. (1996). Characterization of reproductive hormonal dynamics in the perimenopause. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 81(4), 14951501.Google ScholarPubMed
Schliep, K. C., Mumford, S. L., Vladutiu, C. J., Ahrens, K. A., Perkins, N. J., Sjaarda, L. A., … & Schisterman, E. F. (2015). Perceived stress, reproductive hormones, and ovulatory function: A prospective cohort study. Epidemiology, 26, 177184.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schmidt, P. J., Ben, D. R., Martinez, P. E., Guerrieri, G. M., Harsh, V. L., Thompson, K., … & Rubinow, D. R. (2015). Effects of estradiol withdrawal on mood in women with past perimenopausal depression: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA Psychiatry, 72(7), 714726.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schummers, L., Hutcheon, J. A., Hacker, M. R., VanderWeele, T. J., Williams, P. L., McElrath, T. F., & Hernandez-Diaz, S. (2018). Absolute risks of obstetric outcomes by maternal age at first birth: a population-based cohort. Epidemiology, 29(3), 379387.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sedlak, T., Shufelt, C., Iribarren, C., & Merz, C. N. (2012). Sex hormones and the QT interval: a review. Journal of Women’s Health (Larchmt), 21(9), 933941.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Seltzer, V. I., Benjamin, F., & Deutsch, S. (1990). Perimenopausal bleeding patterns and pathological findings. Journal American Medical Women’s Association, 45, 132134.Google Scholar
Shea, A., & Vitzthum, V. J. (2020). The extent and causes of natural variation in menstrual cycles: Integrating empirically-based models of ovarian cycling into research on women’s health. Drug Discovery Today: Disease Models, 32, 4149.Google Scholar
Simon, J. A., Robinson, D. E., Andrews, M. C., Hildebrand, J. R. 3rd, Rocci, M. L. Jr., Blake, R. E., & Hodgen, G. D. (1993). The absorption of oral micronized progesterone: the effect of food, dose proportionality, and comparison with intramuscular progesterone. Fertility and Sterility, 60(1), 2633.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
van Hooff, M. H., Voorhorst, F. J., Kaptein, M. B., Hirasing, R. A., Koppenaal, C., & Schoemaker, J. (1998). Relationship of the menstrual cycle pattern in 14–17 year old adolescents with gynaecological age, body mass index and historical parameters. Human Reproduction, 13(8), 22522260.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitzthum, V. J., Bentley, G. R., Spielvogel, H., Caceres, E., Thornburg, J., Jones, L., … & Chatterton, R. T. (2002). Salivary progesterone levels and rate of ovulation are significantly lower in poorer than in better-off urban-dwelling Bolivian women. Human Reproduction, 17(7), 19061913.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitzthum, V. J., Spielvogel, H., Caceres, E., & Gaines, J. (2000). Menstrual patterns and fecundity among non-lactating and lactating cycling women in rural highland Bolivia: implications for contraceptive choice. Contraception, 62(4), 181187.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitzthum, V. J., Spielvogel, H., & Thornburg, J. (2004). Interpopulational differences in progesterone levels during conception and implantation in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the USA, 101(6), 14431448.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Vitzthum, V. J., Thornburg, J., & Spielvogel, H. (2009). Seasonal modulation of reproductive effort during early pregnancy in humans. American Journal of Human Biology, 21(4), 548558.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Waugh, E. J., Polivy, J., Ridout, R., & Hawker, G. A. (2007). A prospective investigation of the relations among cognitive dietary restraint, subclinical ovulatory disturbances, physical activity, and bone mass in healthy young women. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(6), 17911801.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wei, S., Schmidt, M. D., Dwyer, T., Norman, R. J., & Venn, A. J. (2009). Obesity and menstrual irregularity: Associations with SHBG, testosterone, and insulin. Obesity (SilverSpring), 17(5), 10701076.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weiss, N. S., Szekely, D. R., & Austin, D. F. (1976). Increasing incidence of endometrial cancer in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine, 294(23), 12591262.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, N. I., Berga, S. L., & Cameron, J. L. (2007). Synergism between psychosocial and metabolic stressors: Impact on reproductive function in cynomolgus monkeys. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 293(1), E270E276.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, N. I., Leidy, H. J., Hill, B. R., Lieberman, J. L., Legro, R. S., & De Souza, M. J. (2015). Magnitude of daily energy deficit predicts frequency but not severity of menstrual disturbances associated with exercise and caloric restriction. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 308(1), E29–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative I. (2002). Risks and benefits of estrogen plus progestin in health postmenopausal women: Principal results from the Women’s Health Initiative Randomized Control trial. JAMA, 288, 3233.Google Scholar

References

28 Too Many. (2018). The law and FGM: An overview of 28 African countries. www.28toomany.org/LawGoogle Scholar
Abusharaf, R. M. (2013). Female circumcision: Multicultural perspectives, Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.Google Scholar
Adam, T., Bathija, H., Bishai, D., Bonnenfant, Y.-T., Darwish, M., Huntington, D., & Johansen, E. (2010). Estimating the obstetric costs of female genital mutilation in six African countries. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 88, 281288.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ahmadu, F. (2000). Rites and wrongs: An insider/outsider reflects on power and excision. In Shell-Duncan, B. & Hernlund, Y. (Eds.), Female “circumcision” in Africa: Culture, controversy and change (pp. 283212). Boulder, CO: Lynne Reiner Publishers.Google Scholar
Almroth, L., Almroth-Berggren, V., Hassanein, O. M., Al-Said, S. S. E., Hasan, S. S. A., Lithell, U. B., & Bergstrom, S. (2001). Male complications of female genital mutilation. Social Science & Medicine, 53, 14551460.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Andersson, M., & Simmons, L. W. (2006). Sexual selection and mate choice. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 21, 296302.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Apostolou, M. (2008). Bridewealth and brideservice as instruments of parental choice. Journal of Social, Evolutionary, and Cultural Psychology, 2, 89102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barrett, L., Dunbar, R. I. M., & Lycett, J. E. (2002). Human evolutionary psychology. Basingstoke: Palgrave.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berg, R. C., & Denison, E. (2012). Does female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) affect women’s sexual functioning? A systematic review of the sexual consequences of FGM/C. Sexuality Research and Social Policy, 9, 4156.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Berg, R. C., & Denison, E. (2013). A tradition in transition: Factors perpetuating and hindering the continuance of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) summarized in a systematic review. Health Care for Women International, 34, 837859.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Berg, R. C., & Underland, V. (2013). The obstetric consequences of female genital mutilation/cutting: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Obstetrics & Gynecololgy International, 2013, 496564.Google ScholarPubMed
Bjälkander, O., Leigh, B., Harman, G., Bergström, S., & Almroth, L. (2012). Female genital mutilation in Sierra Leone: Who are the decision makers? African Journal of Reproductive Health, 16, 119131.Google ScholarPubMed
Borgerhoff Mulder, M., & Schact, R. (2012). Human behavioral ecology. eLS. https://doi.org/10.1002/9780470015902.a0003671.pub2CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boyd, R., & Richerson, P. J. (1985). Culture and the evolutionary process. Chicago: Chicago University Press.Google Scholar
Boyden, J., Pankhurst, A., & Tafere, Y. (2012). Child protection and harmful traditional practices: Female early marriage and genital modification in Ethiopia. Development in Practice, 22, 510522.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M. (1989). Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12, 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., Larsen, R. J., Westen, D., & Semmelroth, J. (1992). Sex differences in jealousy: Evolution, physiology, and psychology. Psychological Science, 3, 251256.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cloward, K. (2015). Elites, exit options, and social barriers to norm change: The complex case of female genital mutilation. Studies in Comparative International Development, 50, 378407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Daly, M., Wilson, M., & Weghorst, S. J. (1982). Male sexual jealousy. Ethology and Sociobiology, 3, 1127.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dellenborg, L. (2004). A reflection on the cultural meanings of female circumcision; experiences of fieldwork in Senegal. In Arnfred, S. (Ed.), Re-thinking sexualities in Africa ( pp. 7998). Sweden: Almqvist & Wiksell Tryckeri AB.Google Scholar
Diop, N. J., & Askew, I. (2009). The effectiveness of a community-based education program on abandoning female genital mutilation/cutting in Senegal. Studies in Family Planning, 40, 307318.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dorkenoo, E. (1994). Cutting the rose: Female genital mutilation – the practice and its prevention. London: Minority Rights Group Publications.Google Scholar
Efferson, C., Vogt, S., Elhadi, A., Ahmed, H. E., & Fehr, E. (2015). Female genital cutting is not a social coordination norm. Science, 349, 14461447.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
El Dareer, A. (1982). Woman, why do you weep? Circumcision and its consequences. London: Zed Press.Google Scholar
El-Tom, A. O. (1998). Female circumcision and ethnic identification in Sudan with special reference to the Berti of Darfur. GeoJournal, 46, 163170.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gibson, M. A., Gurmu, E., Cobo, B. C., Rueda, M. M., & Scott, I. M. (2018). Indirect questioning method reveals hidden support for female genital cutting in South Central Ethiopia. PLOS ONE, 13, e0184430.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gibson, M. A., & Lawson, D. W. (2015). Applying evolutionary anthropology. Evolutionary Anthropology, 24, 314.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Goetz, A. T., & Shackelford, T. K. (2006). Sexual coercion and forced in-pair copulation as anti-cuckoldry tactics in humans. In Platek, S. M. & Shackelford, T. K. (Eds.), Female infidelity and paternal uncertainty. (pp. 8299). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gosselin, C. (2000). Feminism, anthropology and the politics of excision in Mali: Global and local debates in a postcolonial world. Anthropologica, 42, 4360.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grafen, A. (1984). Natural selection, kin selection and group selection. In Krebs, J. R. & Davies, N. B. (Eds.), Behavioural ecology: An evolutionary approach, 2nd ed. (pp. 6284). Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications.Google Scholar
Grafen, A. (1990). Biological signals as handicaps. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 144, 517546.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Griskevicius, V., Tybur, J. M., Sundie, J. M., Cialdini, R. B., Miller, G. F., & Kenrick, D. T. (2007). Blatant benevolence and conspicuous consumption: When romantic motives elicit strategic costly signals. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93, 85102.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gruenbaum, E. (2000). Is female “circumcision” a maladaptive cultural pattern. In Shell-Duncan, B. & Hernlund, Y. (Eds.), Female “circumcision” in Africa; culture, controversy and change (pp. 4154). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner Publishers.Google Scholar
Gruenbaum, E. (2001). The female circumcision controversy: An anthropological perspective. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gruenbaum, E. (2005). Socio-cultural dynamics of female genital cutting: Research findings, gaps, and directions. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 7(5), 429441.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hamilton, W. D. (1964). Genetical evolution of social behaviour I, II. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 7, 152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hartung, J. (1985). Matrilineal inheritance: New theory and analysis. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 8, 661670.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hartung, J., Abelson, A. E., Basu, A., Basu, M. P., Beals, K. L., Chiarelli, B., … & Korey, K. A. (1976). On natural selection and the inheritance of wealth [and comments and reply]. Current Anthropology, 17, 607622.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hayes, R. O. (1975). Female genital mutilation, fertility control, women’s roles, and the patrilineage in modern Sudan: A functional analysis. American Ethnologist, 2, 617633.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hill, K. (1993). Life history theory and evolutionary anthropology. Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 2, 7888.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hosken, F. (1979). The Hosken Report: Genital and sexual mutilation of females. Lexington, MA: Women’s International Network News.Google Scholar
Howard, J. A., & Gibson, M. A. (2017). Frequency-dependent female genital cutting behaviour confers evolutionary fitness benefits. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 1, 0049.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Howard, J. A., & Gibson, M. A. 2019. Is there a link between paternity concern and female genital cutting in West Africa? Evolution and Human Behavior, 40(1), 111.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnsdotter, S., & Essen, B. 2010. Genitals and ethnicity: The politics of genital modifications. Reproductive Health Matters, 18, 2937.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Khaja, K., Barkdull, C., Augustine, M., & Cunningham, D. (2009). Female genital cutting:African women speak out. International Social Work, 52, 727741.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laland, K. N., & Brown, G. (2011). Sense and nonsense: Evolutionary perspectives on human behaviour. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Leonard, L. (2000). Adopting female “circumcision” in southern Chad: The experience of Myabe. Female “circumcision” in Africa: Culture, controversy, and change (pp. 167192). Boulder, CO: Lynne Rienner.Google Scholar
Lightfoot-Klein, H. (1989). The sexual experience and marital adjustment of genitally circumcised and infibulated females in the Sudan. The Journal of Sex Research, 26, 375392.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Longman, C., & Bradley, T. (2015). Interrogating the concept of “harmful cultural practices.” In Longman, C., & Bradley, T. (Eds.), Interrogating harmful cultural practices; gender, culture and coercion. Abingdon: Ashgate Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Mackie, G. (1996). Ending footbinding and infibulation: A convention account. American Sociological Review, 61, 9991017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mackie, G., & LeJeune, J. (2009). Social dynamics of abandonment of harmful practices: A new look at the theory. Innocenti Working Paper No. 2009-06 ed. Florence: UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre.Google Scholar
Mattison, S. M., & Sear, R. (2016). Modernizing evolutionary anthropology. Human Nature, 27, 335350.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mpofu, S., Odimegwu, C., De Wet, N., Adedini, S., & Akinyemi, J. (2016). The relation of female circumcision to sexual behavior in Kenya and Nigeria. Women & Health, 57, 757774.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mulongo, P., Hollins Martin, C., & McAndrew, S. (2014). The psychological impact of female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) on girls/women’s mental health: A narrative literature review. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 32, 469485.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Njambi, W. N. (2004). Dualisms and female bodies in representations of African female circumcision: A feminist critique. Feminist Theory, 5, 281303.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Obermeyer, M. C. (2005). The consequences of female circumcision for health and sexuality: An update on the evidence. Culture, Health & Sexuality, 7, 443461.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Odimegwu, C., & Okemgbo, C. (2000). Female circumcision and sexual activity: “Any relationship”. UNILAG Sociological Review, 1, 159176.Google Scholar
Okonofua, F. E., Larsen, U., Oronsaye, F., Snow, R. C., & Slanger, T. E. (2002). The association between female genital cutting and correlates of sexual and gynaecological morbidity in Edo State, Nigeria. BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, 109, 10891096.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oyefara, J. L. (2015). Female genital mutilation (FGM) and sexual functioning of married women in Oworonshoki Community, Lagos State, Nigeria. Etude de la Population Africaine, 29, 1526.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reason, L. L. (2004). The behavioral ecology of female genital cutting in Northern Ghana. In Alvard, M. S. (Ed.), Socioeconomic aspects of human behavioral ecology. Bingley: Emerald Publishing Ltd.Google Scholar
Ross, C. T., Strimling, P., Ericksen, K. P., Lindenfors, P., & Borgerhoff Mulder, M. (2016). The origins and maintenance of female genital modification across Africa: Bayesian phylogenetic modeling of cultural evolution under the influence of selection. Human Nature, 27, 173200.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sakeah, E., Doctor, H., Beke, A., & Hodgson, A. (2006). Males’ preference for circumcised women in Northern Ghana. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 10, 3747.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Schelling, T. (1978) Micromotives and macrobehavior. New York: Norton & Company.Google Scholar
Shell-Duncan, B., & Hernlund, Y. (2000). Female “circumcision” in Africa: Culture, controversy, and change. Boulder, CO, and London: Lynne Rienner Publishers.Google Scholar
Shell-Duncan, B., & Hernlund, Y. (2006). Are there “stages of change” in the practice of female genital cutting? Qualitative research finding from Senegal and the Gambia. African Journal of Reproductive Health, 10, 5771.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shell-Duncan, B., Wander, K., Hernlund, Y., & Moreau, A. (2011). Dynamics of change in the practice of female genital cutting in Senegambia: Testing predictions of social convention theory. Social Science & Medicine, 73, 12751283.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Sosis, R. (2000). Costly signaling and torch fishing on Ifaluk atoll. Evolution and Human Behavior, 21, 223244.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tinbergen, N. (1963). On aims and methods in ethology. Zeitschrift fur Tierpsychologie, 20, 410433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Trivers, R. (1972). Parental investment and sexual selection, Biological Laboratories, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
UN (1995). Fact sheet No. 23, Harmful traditional practices affecting the health of women and children. Geneva: United Nations, Office for the High Commissioner of Human Rights.Google Scholar
UN (2016). Transforming our world: The 2030 agenda for Sustainable Development A/RES/70/1. Geneva: United Nations.Google Scholar
UN General Assembly (1993). Declaration on the elimination of violence against women. Geneva: UN General Assembly.Google Scholar
UNAIDS, UNDP, UNECA, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNHCHR, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNIFEM, & WHO (2008). Eliminating female genital mutilation: an interagency statement. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
UNFPA & UNICEF (2017). Accelerating change by the numbers. Annual report of the UNFPA–UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting: Accelerating change. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund.Google Scholar
UNICEF (1989). Convention on the rights of the child. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund.Google Scholar
UNICEF (2008). Long term evaluation of the TOSTAN programme in Senegal: Kolda, Thies and Fatick region. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund.Google Scholar
UNICEF (2013). Female genital mutilation/cutting: A statistical overview and exploration of the dynamics of change. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund.Google Scholar
UNICEF (2016). Female genital mutilation/cutting: A global concern. New York: United Nations Children’s Fund.Google Scholar
Van Rossem, R., & Gage, A. J. (2009). The effects of female genital mutilation on the onset of sexual activity and marriage in Guinea. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 38, 178185.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Varol, N., Turkmani, S., Black, K., Hall, J., & Dawson, A. (2015). The role of men in abandonment of female genital mutilation: a systematic review. BMC Public Health, 15 , 114.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wagner, N. (2015). Female genital cutting and long-term health consequences – nationally representative estimates across 13 countries. Journal of Development Studies, 51, 226246.Google Scholar
Wander, K. (2017). Cultural evolution: Evolution of female genital cutting. Nature Ecology & Evolution, 1, 0079.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
WHO (1979). Seminar on traditional practices affecting the health of women and children, Khartoum, 10–15 February. Khartoum: WHO.Google Scholar
WHO (2014). Female genital mutilation: Fact sheet No. 241. www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs241/en/Google Scholar
WHO, UNICEF, & UNFP (1997). Female genital mutilation: A joint WHO/UNICEF/UNFPA statement. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar
Wilson, C. G. (2008). Male genital mutilation: An adaptation to sexual conflict. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29, 149164.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Bank (2020). Fertility rate, total (births per woman). https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/SP.DYN.TFRT.INGoogle Scholar
Yoder, P., Abderrahim, N., & Zhuzhuni, A. (2004). Female genital cutting in the demographic and health surveys: A critical and comparative analysis. DHS Comparative Reports No. 7, Calverton, MD: ORC Macro.Google Scholar
Yoder, S. P., & Wang, S. (2013). Female Genital Cutting: The Interpretation of Recent DHS DataFemale Genital Cutting: The Interpretation of Recent DHS Data. DHS Comparative Reports No. 33. Calverton, MD: ICF International.Google Scholar
Yount, K. M., & Abraham, B. K. (2007). Female genital cutting and HIV/AIDS among Kenyan women. Studies in Family Planning, 38, 7388.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Zahavi, A. (1975). Mate selection – selection for a handicap. Journal of Theoretical Biology, 53, 205214.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed

References

Boehm, C. (2012). Ancestral hierarchy and conflict. Science, 336(6083), 844847.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Campaña, H., Rittler, M., Gili, J. A., Poletta, F. A., Pawluk, M. S., Giménez, L. G., … & Camelo, J. S. L. (2017). Association between a maternal history of miscarriages and birth defects. Birth Defects Research, 109(4), 254261.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Daly, M., & Wilson, M. 1999. Darwinism and the roots of machismo. Scientific American Presents, 10, 814.Google Scholar
Chen, E., Turiano, N. A., Mroczek, D. K., & Miller, G. E. (2016). Association of reports of childhood abuse and all-cause mortality rates in women. JAMA Psychiatry, 73(9), 920927.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gray, J. P. (1998). Ethnographic Atlas Codebook derived from George P. Murdock’s Ethnographic Atlas recording the marital composition of 1231 societies from 1960 to 1980. World Cultures, 10(1), 86136.Google Scholar
Hudson, V. M., Bowen, D. L., & Nielsen, P. L. (2015). Clan governance and state stability: The relationship between female subordination and political order. American Political Science Review, 109(03), 535555.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, V. M., Bowen, D. L., & Nielsen, P. L. (2020). The first political order: How sex shapes governance and national security worldwide. New York: Columbia University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, V. M., Ballif-Spanvill, B., Caprioli, M., & Emmett, C. F. (2012). Sex and world peace. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
Hudson, V. M., Caprioli, M., Ballif-Spanvill, B., McDermott, R., & Emmett, C. F. (2009). The heart of the matter: The security of women and the security of states. International Security, 33(3), 745.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, V. M., & Den Boer, A. (2002). A surplus of men, a deficit of peace: Security and sex ratios in Asia’s largest states. International Security, 26 (4), 538.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hudson, V. M., & Den Boer, A. M. (2004). Bare branches: The security implications of Asia’s surplus male population. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Hudson, V. M., & Matfess, H. (2017). In plain sight: The neglected linkage between brideprice and violent conflict. International Security, 42(1), 740.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hurtado, A. M., & Hill, K. R. (1992). Paternal effect on offspring survivorship among Ache and Hiwi hunter-gatherers: Implications for modeling pair-bond stability. In Hewlett, B. (Ed.), Father–child relations: Cultural and biosocial contexts, (pp. 3155). London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
Irons, W. (1979). Cultural and biological success. In Chagnon, N. and Irons, W. (Eds.), Evolutionary biology and human social behavior: An anthropological perspective (pp. 257272). North Scituate, MA: Duxbury Press.Google Scholar
Jaffee, S., Caspi, A., Moffitt, T. E., Belsky, J. A. Y., & Silva, P. (2001). Why are children born to teen mothers at risk for adverse outcomes in young adulthood? Results from a 20-year longitudinal study. Development and psychopathology, 13(2), 377397.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Levine, N. E. (1988). The dynamics of polyandry: kinship, domesticity, and population on the Tibetan border. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
Nasar, Khudai Noor. (January 14, 2021). Taliban cracks down on “costly” polygyny. BBC World Service.Google Scholar
McDermott, R. (2018). The evils of polygyny: Evidence of its harm to women, men, and society. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
McDermott, R., & Cowden, J. (2014). Polygyny and violence against women. Emory Law Journal, 64, 1767.Google Scholar
McDermott, R., & Cowden, J. (2018). Polygyny and violence against women. In Monroe, K. (Ed.), The evils of polygyny: Evidence of its harm to women, men, and society (pp. 5296). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
McDermott, R., Dickerson, M., Fish, S., Lussier, D., & Cowden, J. (2018). Attitudes toward polygyny. In Monroe, K. (Ed.), The evils of polygyny: Evidence of its harm to women, men, and society (pp. 97). Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
Rexer, J. (2020). The brides of Boko Haram: Economic shocks, marriage practices, and insurgency in Nigeria. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
Tertilt, M. (2005). Polygyny, fertility, and savings. Journal of Political Economy, 113(6), 13411371.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Weber, H. (2019). Age structure and political violence: A re-assessment of the “youth bulge” hypothesis. International Interactions, 45(1), 80112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Widom, C. S., & Wilson, H. W. (2015). Intergenerational transmission of violence. In Lindert, J. & Levav, I. (Eds.), Violence and mental health (pp. 2745). Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
Wrangham, R. W. (2009). Males’ greater tolerance of same-sex peers. Psychological Science, 20(2), 184190.Google Scholar
Wrangham, R. W. (2018). Two types of aggression in human evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(2), 245253.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wray, B. J., Reimer, K., & Cameron, C. (2014). The most comprehensive judicial record ever produced: The polygamy reference. Emory Law Journal, 64, 1877.Google Scholar

References

American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, 5th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Androvicova, R., Novak, O., Hula, M., Tomecek, D., Hlinka, J., Weiss, P., & Klapilova, K. (2018). Is stranger rape a strategy to avoid female courtship behavior?: A parallel fMRI and penile plethysmography study. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 15, S246S247.Google Scholar
Apostolou, M. (2015). Sexual dysfunctions in men: An evolutionary perspective. Evolutionary Psychological Science, 1, 220231.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apostolou, M., & Khalil, M. (2019). Aggressive and humiliating sexual play: Occurrence rates and discordance between the sexes. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48, 21872200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Aronsson, H. (2011). Sexual imprinting and fetishism: An evolutionary hypothesis. In Adriaens, P. & De Block, A. (Eds.), Maladapting minds: Philosophy, psychiatry, and evolutionary theory (pp. 6590). Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Bailey, J. M., Vasey, P. L., Diamond, L. M., Breedlove, S. M., Vilain, E., & Epprecht, M. (2016). Sexual orientation, controversy, and science. Psychological Science in the Public Interest, 17, 45101.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bártová, K., Androvičová, R., Krejčová, L., Weiss, P., & Klapilová, K. (2021). The prevalence of paraphilic interests in the Czech population: Preference, arousal, the use of pornography, fantasy, and behavior. The Journal of Sex Research, 58, 8696.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Baur, E., Forsman, M., Santtila, P., Johansson, A., Sandnabba, K., & Långström, N. (2016). Paraphilic sexual interests and sexually coercive behavior: A population-based twin study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45(5), 11631172.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Beach, F. A. (1976). Sexual attractivity, proceptivity, and receptivity in female mammals. Hormones and Behavior, 7, 105138.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Behrendt, N., Buhl, N., & Seidl, S. (2002). The lethal paraphiliac syndrome: Accidental autoerotic deaths in four women and a review of the literature. International Journal of Legal Medicine, 116, 148152.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Boothroyd, L. G., Cross, C. P., Gray, A. W., Coombes, C., & Gregson-Curtis, K. (2011). Perceiving the facial correlates of sociosexuality: Further evidence. Personality and Individual Differences, 50, 422425.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Briken, P., & Krueger, R. B. (2018). From atypical sexual interests to paraphilic disorders: The planned ICD revisions related to paraphilic disorder. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 15, 807808.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brody, S., Klapilová, K., & Krejčová, L. (2013). More frequent vaginal orgasm is associated with experiencing greater excitement from deep vaginal stimulation. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 10, 17301736.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brooks, R., Hunt, J., Blows, M. W., Smith, M. J., Bussière, L. F., & Jennions, M. D. (2005). Experimental evidence for multivariate stabilizing sexual selection. Evolution, 59, 871880.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. M. (1989). Sex differences in human mate preferences: Evolutionary hypotheses tested in 37 cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 12, 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Camilleri, J. A. (2012). Evolutionary psychological perspectives on sexual offending: From etiology to intervention. In Shackelford, T. K. & Weekes-Shackelford, V. A. (Eds.), Oxford handbook of evolutionary perspectives on violence, homicide, and war (pp. 173196). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Cantor, J. M. (2012). Is homosexuality a paraphilia? The evidence for and against. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 41, 237247.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cantor, J. M., & Fedoroff, J. P. (2018). Can pedophiles change? Response to opening arguments and conclusions. Current Sexual Health Reports, 10, 213220.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Carson, C., & Gunn, K. (2006). Premature ejaculation: Definition and prevalence. International Journal of Impotence Research, 18, S5S13.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Chen, C. Y., Raine, A., Chou, K. H., Chen, I. Y., Hung, D., & Lin, C. P. (2016). Abnormal white matter integrity in rapists as indicated by diffusion tensor imaging. BMC Neuroscience, 17, 18.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Clark, S. K., Jeglic, E. L., Calkins, C., & Tatar, J. R. (2016). More than a nuisance: The prevalence and consequences of frotteurism and exhibitionism. Sexual Abuse, 28, 319.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dawson, S. J., Bannerman, B. A., & Lalumière, M. L. (2016). Paraphilic interests: An examination of sex differences in a nonclinical sample. Sexual Abuse, 28, 2045.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dixson, A. F. (1998). Primate sexuality: Comparative studies of the prosimians, monkeys, apes, and human beings. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Doidge, N. (2007) The brain that changes itself: Stories of personal triumph from the frontiers of brain science. New York: Viking Penguin.Google Scholar
Enquist, M., Aronsson, H., Ghirlanda, S., Jansson, L., & Jannini, E. A. (2011). Exposure to mother’s pregnancy and lactation in infancy is associated with sexual attraction to pregnancy and lactation in adulthood. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 8, 140147.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Freund, K. (1990). Courtship disorder. In Handbook of sexual assault (pp. 195207). Boston, MA: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Freund, K., & Blanchard, R. (1993). Erotic target location errors in male gender dysphorics, paedophiles, and fetishists. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 162, 558563.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Freund, K., & Watson, R. J. (1992). The proportions of heterosexual and homosexual pedophiles among sex offenders against children: An exploratory study. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 18, 3443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gangestad, S. W., & Simpson, J. A. (2000). The evolution of human mating: Trade-offs and strategic pluralism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 23, 573587.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Grundmann, D., Krupp, J., Scherner, G., Amelung, T., & Beier, K. M. (2016). Stability of self-reported arousal to sexual fantasies involving children in a clinical sample of pedophiles and hebephiles. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 45, 11531162.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hsu, K. J., & Bailey, J. M. (2019). The “furry” phenomenon: Characterizing sexual orientation, sexual motivation, and erotic target identity inversions in male furries. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48, 13491369.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Imhoff, R., Banse, R., & Schmidt, A. F. (2017). Toward a theoretical understanding of sexual orientation and sexual motivation. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46, 2933.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ingraham, C. (2015). Sex toy injuries surged after ‘Fifty Shades of Grey’s was published. The Washington Post. February 10.Google Scholar
James, E. L. (2012). Fifty shades of grey. New York: Vintage Books.Google Scholar
Joyal, C. C., & Carpentier, J. (2017). The prevalence of paraphilic interests and behaviors in the general population: A provincial survey. The Journal of Sex Research, 54, 161171.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kafka, M. P. (2010). The DSM diagnostic criteria for fetishism. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 39, 357362.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kafka, M. (2012). Axis I psychiatric disorders, paraphilic sexual offending and implications for pharmacological treatment. The Israel Journal of Psychiatry and Related Sciences, 49, 255261.Google ScholarPubMed
Kenrick, D. T., & Keefe, R. C. (1992). Age preferences in mates reflect sex differences in human reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 15, 7591.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Klapilová, K., & Bártová, K. (2017). Sexual pathology. In T. K. Shackelford & V. Weekes-Shackelford (Eds.), Encyclopedia of evolutionary psychological science. New York: Springer International Publishing. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-16999-6_3382-1Google Scholar
Kolářský, A. (2008). Jak porozumět sexuálním deviacím: Teoretická východiska sexodiagnostiky-cesta k tvorbě náhledu ak realizaci sexuality v mezích zákona. Prague: Galén.Google Scholar
Kolářský, A., & Madlafousek, J. (1983). The inverse role of preparatory erotic stimulation in exhibitionists: Phallometric studies. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 12, 123148.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lawrence, A. A. (2009). Erotic target location errors: An underappreciated paraphilic dimension. The Journal of Sex Research, 46, 194215.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lewis, R. W., Fugl‐Meyer, K. S., Bosch, R., Fugl‐Meyer, A. R., Laumann, E. O., Lizza, E., & Martin‐Morales, A. (2004). Epidemiology/risk factors of sexual dysfunction. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 1, 3539.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lippa, R. A. (2006). Is high sex drive associated with increased sexual attraction to both sexes? It depends on whether you are male or female. Psychological Science, 17, 4652.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mann, R. E., Hanson, R. K., & Thornton, D. (2010). Assessing risk for sexual recidivism: Some proposals on the nature of psychologically meaningful risk factors. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 22, 191217.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Marshall, W. L. (2007). Diagnostic issues, multiple paraphilias, and comorbid disorders in sexual offenders: Their incidence and treatment. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 12, 1635.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martijn, F. M., Babchishin, K. M., Pullman, L. E., & Seto, M. C. (2020). Sexual attraction and falling in love in persons with pedohebephilia. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 114.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Martinez, K. (2018). BDSM role fluidity: A mixed-methods approach to investigating switches within dominant/submissive binaries. Journal of Homosexuality, 65, 12991324.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McPhail, I. V., Olver, M. E., Brouillette-Alarie, S., & Looman, J. (2018). Taxometric analysis of the latent structure of pedophilic interest. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 47, 22232240.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Money, J. (1990). Pedophilia: A specific instance of new phylism theory as applied to paraphilic lovemaps (pp. 445463). New York: Springer.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Money, J. (2012). Lovemaps: Clinical concepts of sexual/erotic health and pathology, paraphilia, and gender transposition in childhood, adolescence, and maturity. New York: Prometheus Books.Google Scholar
Müller, K., Curry, S., Ranger, R., Briken, P., Bradford, J., & Fedoroff, J. P. (2014). Changes in sexual arousal as measured by penile plethysmography in men with pedophilic sexual interest. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 11, 12211229.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Mundy, C. L., & Cioe, J. D. (2019). Exploring the relationship between paraphilic interests, sex, and sexual and life satisfaction in non-clinical samples. The Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 28, 304316.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Nesse, R. M. (2002). Evolutionary biology a basic science for psychiatry. Official Journal of the Word Psychiatric Association, 1, 79.Google ScholarPubMed
Pfaus, J. G., Erickson, K. A., & Talianakis, S. (2013). Somatosensory conditioning of sexual arousal and copulatory behavior in the male rat: A model of fetish development. Physiology & Behavior, 122, 17.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pfaus, J. G., Kippin, T. E., Coria-Avila, G. A., Gelez, H., Afonso, V. M., Ismail, N., & Parada, M. (2012). Who, what, where, when (and maybe even why)? How the experience of sexual reward connects sexual desire, preference, and performance. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 41, 3162.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pfaus, J. G., Quintana, G. R., Mac Cionnaith, C. E., Gerson, C. A., Dubé, S., & Coria-Avila, G. A. (2020). Conditioning of sexual interests and paraphilias in humans is difficult to see, virtually impossible to test, and probably exactly how it happens: A comment on Hsu and Bailey (2020). Archives of Sexual Behavior, 49, 14031407.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Plaud, J. J., & Martini, J. R. (1999). The respondent conditioning of male sexual arousal. Behavior Modification, 23, 254268.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ponseti, J., Bruhn, D., Nolting, J., Gerwinn, H., Pohl, A., Stirn, A., … & Kruger, T. H. (2018). Decoding pedophilia: increased anterior insula response to infant animal pictures. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 11, 645.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ponseti, J., Granert, O., Van Eimeren, T., Jansen, O., Wolff, S., Beier, K., … & Roman Siebner, H. (2016). Assessing paedophilia based on the haemodynamic brain response to face images. The World Journal of Biological Psychiatry, 17, 3946.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Pulverman, C. S., Kilimnik, C. D., & Meston, C. M. (2018). The impact of childhood sexual abuse on women’s sexual health: A comprehensive review. Sexual Medicine Reviews, 6, 188200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Quinsey, V. L. (2012). Pragmatic and Darwinian views of the paraphilias. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 41, 217220.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Quinsey, V. L., & Lalumière, M. L. (1995). Evolutionary perspectives on sexual offending. Sexual Abuse: A Journal of Research and Treatment, 7, 301315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rachman, S. (1966). Sexual fetishism: An experimental analogue. Psychological Record, 16, 293296.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmidt, A. F. & Imhoff, R. (in press). Towards a theory of chronophilic sexual orientation in heterosexual men. In Craig, L. A. & Bartels, R. M. (Eds.), Sexual deviance: Understanding and managing deviant sexual interest and paraphilic disorders. Boston: Wiley-Blackwell.Google Scholar
Scorolli, C., Ghirlanda, S., Enquist, M., Zattoni, S., & Jannini, E. A. (2007). Relative prevalence of different fetishes. International Journal of Impotence Research, 19, 432437.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seto, M. C. (2008). Pedophilia and sexual offending against children: Theory, assessment, and intervention. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Seto, M. C. (2017). The puzzle of male chronophilias. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46, 322.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seto, M. C., Fedoroff, J. P., Bradford, J. M., Knack, N., Rodrigues, N. C., Curry, S., … & Ahmed, A. G. (2016). Reliability and validity of the DSM-IV-TR and proposed DSM-5 criteria for pedophilia: Implications for the ICD-11 and the next DSM. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry, 49, 98106.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Seto, M. C., Lalumière, M. L., Harris, G. T., & Chivers, M. L. (2012). The sexual responses of sexual sadists. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 121, 739.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Stevens, A., & Price, J. (2016). Evolutionary psychiatry: A new beginning. Routledge: Psychologic Press.Google Scholar
Tanner, J. M. (1962). Growth at adolescence (2nd ed.). Oxford: Blackwell Scientific Publications.Google Scholar
Tenbergen, G., Wittfoth, M., Frieling, H., Ponseti, J., Walter, M., Walter, H., … & Kruger, T. H. (2015). The neurobiology and psychology of pedophilia: Recent advances and challenges. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, 344.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Tinbergen, N. (1963). On aims and methods of ethology. Zeitschrift für tierpsychologie, 20, 410433.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vagenknecht, V., Bártová, K., & Klapilová, K., (2019). Metody měření pedofilní preference: přehled recentních trendů. Sexuológia, 2, 1627.Google Scholar
Watts, A. L., Nagel, M. G., Latzman, R. D., & Lilienfeld, S. O. (2019). Personality disorder features and paraphilic interests among undergraduates: Differential relations and potential antecedents. Journal of Personality Disorders, 33, 2248.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Williams, G. C. (2018). Adaptation and natural selection: A critique of some current evolutionary thought (Vol. 75). Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Williams, C. J., & Weinberg, M. S. (2003). Zoophilia in men: A study of sexual interest in animals. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 32, 523535.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Wilson, G. D., & Cox, D. N. (1983). Personality of paedophile club members. Personality and Individual Differences, 4(3), 323329.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organization (1993). The international classification of diseases. Classification of mental and behavioural disorders. Diagnostic criteria for research. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar

References

Abdo, C., Oliveira, W., Moreira, J., & Fittipaldi, J. (2004). Prevalence of sexual dysfunctions and correlated conditions in a sample of Brazilian women—results of the Brazilian study on sexual behavior (BSSB)International Journal of Impotence Research, 16, 160166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Abramowitz, J. S., Tolin, D. F., & Street, G. P. (2001). Paradoxical effects of thought suppression: A meta-analysis of controlled studies. Clinical Psychology Review, 21, 683703.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Althof, S., Dean, J., Derogatis, L., Rosen, R., & Sisson, M. (2005). Current perspectives on the clinical assessment and diagnosis of female sexual dysfunction and clinical studies of potential therapies: A statement of concern. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 2, 146153.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
American Psychiatric Association (2013). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th ed. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association.Google Scholar
Angel, K. (2010). The history of “female sexual dysfunction” as a mental disorder in the 20th century. Current Opinion in Psychiatry, 23, 536551.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apostolou, M. (2016). Understanding the prevalence of sexual dysfunctions in women: An evolutionary perspective. Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology, 26–43.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Apostolou, M., & Khalil, M. (2019). Aggressive and humiliating sexual play: Occurrence rates and discordance between the sexes. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48, 21872200.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Archer, J. (2019). The reality and evolutionary significance of human psychological sex differences. Biological Review, 94, 13811415.Google ScholarPubMed
Bancroft, J., Graham, C. A., Janssen, E., & Sanders, S. A. (2009). The dual control model: Current status and future directions. Journal of Sex Research, 46, 121142.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Bancroft, J., & Janssen, E. (2000). The Duel Control Model of male sexual response: A theoretical approach to centrally mediated erectile dysfunction. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 24, 571579.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, R. F., Catanese, K. R., & Vohs, K. D. (2001). Is there a gender difference in strength of sex drive? Theoretical views, conceptual distinctions, and a review of relevant evidence. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 5, 242273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Birnbaum, G. E. (2017). The fragile spell of desire: A functional perspective on changes in sexual desire across relationship development. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 22, 101127.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Brandon, M., & Morgentaler, A. (2016). Male and female sexual dysfunction in a rapidly changing cultural environment: Addressing equality versus equivalence in the bedroom. Sexual Medicine Reviews, 4, 96102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brandon, M., Shlykova, N., & Morgentaler, A. (2021). Curiosity and other attitudes toward sex robots: Results of an online survey. Journal of Future Robot Life, 1–14.Google Scholar
Brotto, L., Krychman, M., & Jacobson, P. (2008). Eastern approaches for enhancing women’s sexuality: Mindfulness, acupuncture, and yoga. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 5, 27412748.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Burghardt, J., Beutel, M. E., Hasenburg, A., Schmutzer, G. H., & Brahler, E. (2020). Declining sexual activity and desire in women: Findings from representative German surveys 2005 and 2016. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 49, 919925.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Buss, D. (2016). Challenges of mating. In Buss, D. (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary psychology, 2nd ed. (Vol. 1, pp. 287290). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
Buss, D. (2017). Sexual conflict in human mating. Science, 26, 307313.Google Scholar
Buss, D., & Schmitt, D. (1993). Sexual strategies theory: An evolutionary perspective on human matingPsychological Review100, 204232.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Carpenter, D., Janssen, E., Graham, C., Vorst, H., & Wicherts, J. (2008). Women’s scores on the sexual inhibition/sexual excitation scales (SIS/SES): Gender similarities and differences. Journal of Sex Research, 45, 3648.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Crosby, C. L., Buss, D. M., & Meston, C. M. (2019). Sexual disgust: Evolutionary perspectives and relationship to female sexual function. Current Sexual Health Reports, 11, 300306.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cubbins, L., & Tanfer, K. (2000). The influence of gender on sex: A study of men’s and women’s self-reported high-risk sex behavior. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 29, 229257.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Dahlen, H. (2019). Female sexual dysfunction: Assessment and treatment. Urologic Nursing, 39, 3946.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dawson, S., Bannerman, B., & Lalumiere, M. (2014). Paraphilic interests: An examination of sex differences in a non-clinical sample. Sexual Abuse, 28, 2045.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
de Vries, G. J., & Forger, N. G. (2015). Sex differences in the brain: A whole body perspective. Biology of Sex Differences. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13293-015-0032-zCrossRefGoogle Scholar
Fitzgerald, C. J., & Whitaker, M. B. (2010). Examining the acceptance of and resistance to evolutionary psychology. Evolutionary Psychology, 8, 284296.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Gałązka, I., Drosdzol, C. A., Naworska, B., Czajkowska, M., & Skrzypulec, P. V. (2015). Changes in the sexual function during pregnancy. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 12, 445454.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Geher, G., & Gambacorta, D. (2010). Evolution is not relevant to sex differences in humans because I want it that way! Evidence for the politicization of human evolutionary psychology. The Journal of the Evolutionary Studies Consortium, 2, 3247.Google Scholar
Goodwin, B. C., Browne, M., & Rockloff, M. (2015). Measuring preference for supernormal over natural rewards: A two-dimensional anticipatory pleasure scale. Evolutionary Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1177/1474704915613914CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gorelik, G., & Shackelford, T. (2011). Human sexual conflict from molecules to culture. Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 564587.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Grontvedt, T. V., Kennair, L. E., & Bendixen, M. (2020). How intercourse frequency is affected by relationship length, relationship quality, and sexual strategies using couple data. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 14, 147159.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hammond, N., & van Hooff, J. (2020). “This is me, this is what I am, I am a man”: The masculinities of men who pay for sex with women. The Journal of Sex Research, 57, 650663.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hmidan, A., & Weaver, A. D. (2019). Sex dreams: Gender, erotophilia, and sociosexuality as predictors of content, valence, and frequency. Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality, 28, 177189.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Holvoet, L., Huys, W., Coppens, V., Seeuws, J., Goethals, K., & Morrens, M. (2017). Fifty shades of Belgian gray: The prevalence of BDSM-related fantasies and activities in the general population. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 14, 11521159.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Hromatko, I., & Hrgovic, J. (2020). The how and the why of the human inability to accept evolutionary explanations. Evolutionary Behavioral Sciences, 14, 336341.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Janssen, E., & Bancroft, J. (2007). The sexual unconscious. In Janssen, E. (Ed.), The psychophysiology of sex (pp. 166184). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Jaros, F., & Maran, T. (2019). Humans on top, humans among the other animals: Narratives of anthropological differences. Biosemiotics, 12, 381403.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kingsberg, S., Althof, A., Simon, J. A., Bradford, A., Bitzer, J., Carvalho, J., … & Shifren, J. L. (2017). Female sexual dysfunction – Medical and psychological treatments, Committee 14. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 14, 14631491.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kontula, O., & Miettinen, A. (2016). Determinants of female sexual orgasms. Socioaffective Neuroscience and Psychology, 6, 31624.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kuckukdurmaz, F., Efe, E., Malkoc, E., Amasyalt, A., & Resim, S. (2016). Prevalence and correlates of female sexual dysfunction among Turkish pregnant women. Turkish Journal of Urology, 42, 178183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Laumann, E., Paik, A., & Rosen, R. (1999). Sexual dysfunction in the United States: Prevalence and predictors. Journal of the American Medical Association, 281, 537544.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Liesen, L. T. (2007). Understanding the debate between feminist evolutionists and evolutionary psychologists. Politics and Life Sciences, 26, 5170.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lippa, R. (2009). Sex differences in sex drive, sociosexuality, and height across 53 nations: Testing evolutionary and social structural theories. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 38, 631651.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McCool-Myers, M., Theurich, M., Zuelke, A., Knuettel, H., & Apfelbacher, C. (2018). Predictors of female sexual dysfunction: A systematic review and qualitative analysis through gender inequality paradigmsBMC Women’s Health, 18108.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
McNulty, J., Mazwell, J., Meltzer, A., & Baumeister, R. (2019). Sex-differentiated changes in sexual desire predict marital dissatisfaction. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 48, 24732489.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Murray, S. H., & Milhausen, R. R. (2012). Sexual desire and relationship duration in young men and women. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy, 38, 2840.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Parker, K., & Horowitz, J. M. (2015). Parenting in America: Outlook, worries, aspirations are strongly linked to financial situation. Washington, DC: Pew Research Center.Google Scholar
Payne, P., Levine, P. A., & Crane-Godreau, M. A. (2015). Somatic experiencing: Using interoception and proprioception as core elements of trauma therapy. Frontiers in Psychology. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.00093CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peterson, A., Geher, G., & Kaufman, S. B. (2011). Predicting preferences for sex acts: Which traits matter and why? Evolutionary Psychology, 9, 371389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Peterson, J. L. & Hyde, J. S. (2010). A meta-analytic review of research on gender differences in sexuality, 1993–2007. Psychological Bulletin, 136, 2138.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pietromonaco, P. R., & Collins, N. L. (2017). Interpersonal relationships linking close relationships to health. American Psychologist, 72, 531542.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pillsworth, E. G., Haselton, M. G., & Buss, D. M. (2004). Ovulatory shifts in female sexual desire. Journal of Sex Research, 41, 5565.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Porges, S. W. (1998). Love: An emergent property of the mammalian autonomic nervous system. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 23, 837861.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Regnerus, M., Price, J., & Gordon, D. (2017). Masturbation and partnered sex: Substitutes or complements? Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46, 21112121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Reiber, C., & Garcia, J. R. (2010). Hooking up: Gender differences, evolution, and pluralistic ignorance. Evolutionary Psychology. https://doi.org/10.1177/147470491000800307CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schaller, M., & Park, J. H. (2011). The behavioral immune system (and why it matters). Current Directions in Psychological Science, 20, 99103.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schmitt, D. (2016). Fundamentals of human mating strategies. In Buss, D. (Ed.), The handbook of evolutionary psychology, 2nd ed. (Vol. 1, pp. 294316). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.Google Scholar
Serati, S., Salvatore, S., Diesto, G., Cattoni, E., Zanirato, M., Khullar, V., … & Bolis, P. (2010). Female sexual function during pregnancy and after childbirth. Journal of Sexual Medicine, 7, 27822790.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Smith, A., Lyons, A., Ferris, J., Richters, J., Pitts, M., Shelly, J., & Simpson, J. (2011). Sexual and relationship satisfaction among heterosexual men and women: The importance of desired frequency of sex. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 37, 104115.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Spiering, M., & Everaerd, W. (2007). The sexual unconscious. In Janssen, E. (Ed.), The psychophysiology of sex (pp. 166184). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
Symons, D. (1979). The evolution of human sexuality. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Twenge, J., Sherman, R., & Wells, B. (2017). Declines in sexual frequency among American adults, 1989–2014. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46, 23892401.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ueda, P., Mercer, C. H., Ghaznavi, C., & Herbenick, D. (2020). Trends in frequency of sexual activity and number of sexual partners among adults ages 18 to 44 years in the US, 2000–2018. JAMA Network Open Access. doi: 10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2020.3833CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vowels, L., Rosenkrantz, D., Brown, H., & Mark, K. (2020). Ebbs and flows of desire: A qualitative exploration of contextual factors affecting sexual desire in bisexual, lesbian, and strait women. Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy, 46, 807823.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
World Health Organization (2019). ICD-11: International statistical classification of diseases and related health problems, 11th ed. Geneva: WHO.Google Scholar

References

Apostolou, M. (2013). The evolution of rape: The fitness benefits and costs of a forced-sex mating strategy in an evolutionary context. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 18(5), 484490.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Babchishin, K., Seto, M. C., Sariaslan, A., Lichtenstein, P., Fazel, S., & Långström, N. (2017). Parental and perinatal risk factors for sexual offending in men: A nationwide case-control study. Psychological Medicine, 47, 305315.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Barrett, L. F. (2017). How emotions are made: The secret life of the brain. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.Google Scholar
Basile, K. C., Smith, S. G., Chen, J., & Zwald, M. (2020). Chronic diseases, health conditions, and other impacts associated with rape victimization of US women. Journal of Interpersonal Violence. https://doi.org/10.1177/0886260519900335CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Baumeister, D., Lightman, S. L., & Pariante, C. M. (2014). The interface of stress and the HPA axis in behavioral phenotypes of mental illness. In Pariante, C. M. & Lapiz-Bluhm, M. D. (Eds.), Behavioural neurobiology of stress-related disorders. Berlin: Springer.Google Scholar
Blake, E., & Gannon, T. A. (2014). Investigating the implicit theories of rape-prone men using an interpretive bias task: Implicit theories of rape-prone men. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 19(1), 4053.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buller, D. J. (2005). Adapting minds: Evolutionary psychology and the persistent quest for human nature. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.Google Scholar
Bumby, K., & Hansen, D. (1997). Intimacy deficits, fear of intimacy, and loneliness among sexual offenders. Criminal Justice and Behavior, 24(3), 315331.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Buss, D. M., & Schmitt, D. P. (2019). Mate preferences and their behavioral manifestations. Annual Review of Psychology, 70, 77110.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Camilleri, J. A. (2012). Evolutionary psychological perspectives on sexual offending: From etiology to intervention. In Shackelford, T. K. & Weekes-Shackelford, V. A. (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Evolutionary Perspectives on Violence, Homicide, and War. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Clutton-Brock, T. H., & Parker, G. A. (1995). Sexual coercion in animal societies. Animal Behaviour, 49(5), 13451365.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Colombetti, G. (2014). The feeling body: Affective science meets the enactive mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dawkins, R. (1976). The selfish gene. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Dean, K. E., & Malamuth, N. M. (1997). Characteristics of men who aggress sexually and of men who imagine aggressing: Risk and moderating variables. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 72(2), 449455.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Del Giudice, M. (2009). Sex, attachment, and the development of reproductive strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 32(1), 167.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Del Giudice, M. (2018). Evolutionary psychopathology: A unified approach. New York: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Del Giudice, M., Ellis, B. J., & Shirtcliff, E. A. (2011). The adaptive calibration model of stress responsivity. Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 35(7), 15621592.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Del Giudice, M., Hinnant, J. B., Ellis, B. J., & El-Sheikh, M. (2012). Adaptive patterns of stress responsivity: A preliminary investigation. Developmental Psychology, 48(3), 775790.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Durrant, R., & Ward, T. (2015). Evolutionary criminology: Towards a comprehensive explanation of crime. Amsterdam: Academic Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, L. (1991). A synthesized (biosocial) theory of rape. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 59(5), 631642.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Ellis, L. (2005). A theory explaining biological correlates of criminality. European Journal of Criminology, 2(3), 287315.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ellis, B. J., & Del Giudice, M. (2014). Beyond allostatic load: Rethinking the role of stress in regulating human development. Development and Psychopathology, 26(1), 120.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Figueredo, A. J., Sales, B. D., Russell, K. P., Becker, J. V., & Kaplan, M. (2000). A Brunswikian evolutionary–developmental theory of adolescent sex offending. Behavioral Sciences and the Law, 18, 309329.3.0.CO;2-5>CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Figueredo, A. J., Vásquez, G., Brumbach, B. H., Schneider, S. M. R., Sefcek, J. A., Tal, I. R., … & Jacobs, W. J. (2006). Consilience and life history theory: From genes to brain to reproductive strategy. Developmental Review, 26(2), 243275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Galván, A. (2010). Adolescent development of the reward system. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 4, 6.Google ScholarPubMed
Galván, A. (2013). The teenage brain: Sensitivity to rewards. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 22(2), 8893.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gladden, P. R., Sisco, M., & Figueredo, A. J. (2008). Sexual coercion and life-history strategy. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(5), 319326.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goetz, A. T., Shackelford, T. K., & Camilleri, J. A. (2008). Proximate and ultimate explanations are required for a comprehensive understanding of partner rape. Aggression and violent behavior, 13, 13591789.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gunst, E., Watson, J., Desmet, M., & Willemsen, J. (2017). Affect regulation as a factor in sex offenders. Aggression and Violent Behavior 37, 210219.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Heyes, C. (2018). Cognitive gadgets: The cultural evolution of thinking. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hoon, P. W., Wincze, J. P., & Hoon, E. F. (1977). A test of reciprocal inhibition: Are anxiety and sexual arousal in women mutually inhibitory? Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 86(1), 6574.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Jones, O. D., & Goldsmith, T. H. (2005). Law and behavioral biology. Columbia Law Review, 105(2), 405502.Google Scholar
Kalmus, E., & Beech, A. R. (2005). Forensic assessment of sexual interest: A review. Aggression and Violent Behavior, 10(2), 193217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kanin, E. (1985). Date rapists: Differential sexual socialization and relative deprivation. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 14(3), 219231.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Kjellgren, C., Priebe, G., Svedin, C. G., & Långström, N. (2010). Sexually coercive behavior in male youth: Population survey of general and specific risk factors. Archives of Sexual Behavior 39, 11611169.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Laland, K. N., Odling-Smee, J., & Myles, S. (2010). How culture shaped the human genome: Bringing genetics and the human sciences together. Nature Reviews Genetics, 11(2), 137148.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lalumiére, M. L., Fairweather, A., Harrris, G. T., Suschinsky, K. D., & Seto, M. C. (2017). Genital responses to rape vignettes among young men: The influence of mood and directed attention. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 46, 685695.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Lalumiére, M. L., Harris, G. T., Quinsey, V. L., & Rice, M. E. (2005). The causes of rape. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
Maiese, M. (2011). Embodiment, emotion, and cognition. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Maiese, M. (2016). Embodied selves and divided minds. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Malamuth, N. M. (1986). Predictors of naturalistic sexual aggression. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 50(5), 953962.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Malamuth, N. M. (1996). The confluence model of sexual aggression: feminist and evolutionary perspectives. In Buss, D. M. & Malamuth, N. M. (Eds.), Sex, power, conflict: Evolutionary and feminist perspectives (pp. 269295). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Malamuth, N. M., & Hald, G. M. (2016). The confluence mediational model of sexual aggression. In Beech, A. R. &