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Part VII - Sexual Selection and Human Sex Differences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 March 2020

Lance Workman
Affiliation:
University of South Wales
Will Reader
Affiliation:
Sheffield Hallam University
Jerome H. Barkow
Affiliation:
Dalhousie University, Nova Scotia
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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