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5 - Evolution and Consumer Behavior

from Part I - Individual Consumer Decision Making and Behavior

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 October 2015

Michael I. Norton
Affiliation:
Harvard Business School, Harvard University
Derek D. Rucker
Affiliation:
Kellogg School of Management, Northwestern University
Cait Lamberton
Affiliation:
Katz Graduate School of Business, University of Pittsburgh
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Print publication year: 2015

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