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1 - How the Learning Sciences Can Inform Cognitive Psychology

from Part I - Foundations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2019

John Dunlosky
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
Katherine A. Rawson
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
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Summary

In this chapter, we explore the similarities and differences between the learning sciences (LS) and cognitive psychology applied to education (CP), and the potential synergy created through further integrating them. We believe that their mutual strengths can result in a deeper understanding of how learning occurs, and how to design learning environments that maximally foster learning.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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