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How Cognitive Psychology Can Inform Evidence-Based Education Reform

An Overview of The Cambridge Handbook of Cognition and Education

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 February 2019

John Dunlosky
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
Katherine A. Rawson
Affiliation:
Kent State University, Ohio
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Summary

In this chapter, we discuss the challenges of improving education and discuss how the Cambridge handbook of cognition and education is organized. We highlight the key points of each chapter and how they may inform best practices on improving student achievement.
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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