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Chapter 16 - Thoracic Anesthesia

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  24 May 2023

Alan David Kaye
Affiliation:
Louisiana State University School of Medicine
Richard D. Urman
Affiliation:
Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston
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Summary

This is by far the most important aspect of preoperative assessment. Any patient with a score >2 should be referred to cardiology for additional testing. The Revised Cardiac Risk Index is shown in Table 16.1.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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