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Part XVII - Shakespeare as Cultural Icon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

AfricaAfricanappropriationAsian Shakespearesauthor functionBardBardolatry“big-time Shakespeare”digital archivesglobalglobalizationhumanismhumanisticonincarcerationMeasure for Measuremulticulturalismnational iconShakespeare Behind Bars“small-time Shakespeare”spectaclespectatorshiptransculturaltransnationaluniversalityBardolatryBoswell, JamesCovent Gardencultural iconcultural pilgrimageDrury Lane Theatereighteenth centuryGarrick, DavidGarrick’s OdeiconicityJubilee Festival 1769memorabiliaOregon Shakespeare FestivalRoyal Shakespeare CompanyShakespeare MythShakespeare’s mulberry treeStratford-upon-Avonappropriationanti-theatrical prejudiceBates, LauraBergman, John (The Geese Theater)Boal, Augusto (Theater of the Oppressed)Brechtcarceral controlchapel spaceChandler, Larry (Warden)Cobb, HalDavidson and Kerwin (2005)DeClue, Larry (SBB actor)drama therapyecclesiastical spaceFoucault (Discipline and Punish)Fumerton, PatriciaGrotowskiGuenthner, Jerry (SBB actor)Hamleticon(icity), Shakespeare asJulius Caesarjuvenile justiceKing LearMacbethMagill, TomPanoptikonprisonizationrecidivism ratesredemptionRogerson, Hank, and Jilann Spitzmiller (dirs. Shakespeare Behind Bars, Philomath Films)Scott-Douglass, AmyShakespeare Behind BarsShailor, JonathanTocci, Lawrence (The Proscenium Cage)Tofteland, Curt (SBB Founding Artistic Producer and Director)Trounstine, Jean (Shakespeare Behind Bars)Vaughan, Gene (misspelled in the ms.)Wallace, Matt (SBB Director)Waxler, Robert (2008)Wilcox, Agnes (Prison Performing Arts)The Winter’s TaleAdams, Joseph QuincyAmericaAmherst CollegeCarnegie, AndrewCret, Paul PhilippeEmerson, Ralph WaldoFirst FolioFolger, Emily JordanFolger, Henry ClayFurness, Horace HowardGayley, Charles MillsHardison, O. B.Library of CongressPuckPutnam, BrendaPutnam, HerbertQuartoRockefeller, John D.Standard Oil CompanyUS Supreme CourtWashington, D.C.Wright, Louis B.Asian identitiesBrook, PeterClarke, Mary Cowdencontact zoneDenmarkdiasporaThe Girlhood of Shakespeare’s HeroineHamletKing Learmultilingual performanceOng, Keng SenOthelloSingaporeSpivak, Gayatri ChakravortysubjectivityAngoorBollywoodThe Last LearMaqboolOmkaraShakespeare and the “Civilising Mission”Shakespeare and Hindi cinemaShakespeare WallahaboriginalFirst NationsghostsHighway, TomsonMoses, Daniel DavidNolan, Yvetteactive methodscultural materialismeducationGibson, Rexliterary criticismNational CurriculumNewbolt ReportNew HistoricismpedagogyRevised CodeapartheidButler, GuyCronin, JeremyGevisser, MarkGillham, D. G.Lütge, DebbieMbeki, Thabopost-apartheidSouth AfricaVerwoerd, H. F.Advantage West Midlandsarchaeological discoveriesBook of Common Prayerecologyexhibition practicesheritage mythsliving historyShakespeare houses and propertiesshopping for Shakespearesouvenirsstreet performerstourismAboudoma, Mahmoudal-Bassam, SulaymanAleppoArabButler, MichaelThe Comedy of ErrorsCymbelineCyprusDance of the ScorpionsHamletHebrewHebronHenry IV, Part 1IsraelIsraeliJerusalemJewishThe Merchant of VeniceMiddle EastNitzan, OmryOphelia Is Not DeadOrientOslo AgreementsOthelloPalestinian“peace”Richard IIIRomeo and JulietSalkinson, IsaacTchernihovski, ShaulTel AvivThe TempestTroilus and CressidaTwelfth NightTurksanti-Romanticismcharacter criticismgeniusGermanyGoethe, Johann Wolfgang vonGottsched, Johann ChristophHerder Johann Gottfried vonhistorical criticismLessing, Gotthold EphraimnatureneoclassicismorganicismRomanticismSchiller FriedrichSchlegel, A. W.Schlegel, FriedrichStorm and Stresstranslation
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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