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260 - Jazz

from Part XXVI - Shakespeare and the Performing Arts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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References

Sources cited

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Further reading

Booth, Stephen. An Essay on Shakespeare’s Sonnets. New Haven: Yale UP, 1969.Google Scholar
Buhler, Stephen M.Form and Character in Duke Ellington and Billy Strayhorn’s Such Sweet Thunder.” Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 1.1 (spring–summer 2005). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/781406/display.Google Scholar
Buntin, Mat., and Fischlin, Daniel. “Shakespeare, Canada and Jazz: The Ellington Connection.” Canadian Adaptations of Shakespeare Project. http://www.canadianshakespeares.ca/multimedia/audio/m_a_jazz.cfm.Google Scholar
Callaghan, Dympna. Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Malden: Blackwell, 2007.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cooke, Mervyn, and Horn, David, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Jazz. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Corrigan, Alan. “Jazz, Shakespeare and Hybridity: A Script Excerpt from Swingin’ the Dream.” Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 1. 1 (spring–summer 2005). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/781411/display.Google Scholar
Greenblatt, Stephen. Cultural Mobility: A Manifesto. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.Google Scholar
Hansen, Adam. Shakespeare and Popular Music. London: Continuum, 2010.Google Scholar
Hawkes, Terence. “The Duke’s Man: Ellington, Shakespeare and Jazz Adaptation.” Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 1.1 (spring–summer 2005). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/781405/display.Google Scholar
Lanier, Douglas. Shakespeare and Modern Popular Culture. Oxford Shakespeare Topics. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2002.Google Scholar
Newmark, Peter. “Serious Songs: Their Texts as Approximate Translations of Their Music.” Translation Quarterly 41 (2006).Google Scholar
Schalkwyk, David. “Poetry and Performance.” The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare’s Poetry. Ed. Cheney, Patrick. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. 241–59.Google Scholar
Teague, Francis. “Swingin’ Shakespeare from Harlem to Broadway.” Borrowers and Lenders: The Journal of Shakespeare and Appropriation 1.1 (spring–summer 2005). http://www.borrowers.uga.edu/781407/display.Google Scholar
Van Kampen, Claire. Sleep No More: Incidental Jazz Music Composed by Claire Van Kampen with the Shakespeare’s Globe Musicians. From Globe Theater 2001 production of Macbeth. International Globe Centre. 2001. CD.Google Scholar
Vendler, H. The Art of Shakespeare’s Sonnets. Cambridge: Harvard UP, 1999.Google Scholar

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