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Part VIII - High Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 August 2019

Bruce R. Smith
Affiliation:
University of Southern California
Katherine Rowe
Affiliation:
Smith College, Massachusetts
Ton Hoenselaars
Affiliation:
Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands
Akiko Kusunoki
Affiliation:
Tokyo Woman’s Christian University, Japan
Andrew Murphy
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Aimara da Cunha Resende
Affiliation:
Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Brazil
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Keywords

agriculturearchitectureartCatholicismCiceroCoke, Sir Edwardcommonplace bookscultureeducationgendergeographic knowledgegrammar schoolsthe grand tourhistoriographyhistoryhistory of readinghorticulturehumanismLatinlaw and legal culturemanuscript culturemanuscript miscellaniesmedieval culturemercantile culturemerchantsmilitary sciencemusicpatronagepatronsProtestantismreligionrhetoricscience and technologyTacitusuniversitieswarwomen and literatureallegoryaristocracycourtDark LadyOvidPetrarchanismpornographysexsonnet sequencesSpenser, EdmundsymbolArte of English Poesieclassical genrescomedyDefense of PoetryelegyepicepyllionFrye, Northropgeneric innovationGosson, StephenparrhesiaPuttenham, GeorgesatireSidney, Sir PhilipStubbes, PhiliptragedyAntony and CleopatraAphthoniusAs You Like ItBaldwin, T. W.Book of the CourtierCastiglione, BaldassarechreiaCoriolanuscurseDe CopiaekphrasiseloquenceencomiumErasmus, Desideriusethopoeiafablegrammar schoolde Grazia, MargretaHamletHenry IV, Part 1Henry IV, Part 2Henry VhumanismJulius CaesarMarlowe, ChristopherMeasure for MeasureThe Merry Wives of WindsorMetamorphosesA Midsummer Night’s DreamnarrativeOthelloOvidPriscianprogymnasmataprosopopoeiaQuintilianThe Rape of LucrecerhetoricRomeo and JulietsententiaethesisTimon of AthensTitus AndronicusTragedy of King LearTwelfth NightThe Two Gentlemen of VeronaVenus and AdonisvituperationWilliam Shakspere’s small Latine & lesse Greekecatechismchildrendomesticeducationhouseholdmarriagereligious instructionschoolswomenwomen’s literacyAntony and CleopatraapatheiaApology for PoetryAristotleastronomyAs You Like ItataraxiaatomismBodin, JeanBrutusCalibanCassiuscatharsisCiceroThe Comedy of ErrorsconstancyCymbelinedemonologydivine rightdoubtEpictetusEpicureanismGalileoHamletHenry IVHoratioJames IJustus LipsiusKing LearLucreceLucretiusMacbethMachiavelli, NiccolòMarc AntonyMarcus AureliusMeasure for MeasureThe Merry Wives of WindsorMontaigne, Michel deA Midsummer Night’s DreamMuch Ado about NothingnatureNeoplatonismneostoicNicomachean EthicsOthellopathospatriarchyPlatoPoeticsThe PrinceProsperorepublicanismresistanceRichard IIscienceSenecaSextus EmpiricusSidney, Sir PhilipskepticismSocratesStoicismThe Taming of the ShrewThe TempestTitus AndronicusTroilus and CressidaTwelfth NighttyrannyThe Winter’s TalewitchcraftAnglica HistoriaBacon, FrancischronicleThe First Part of the Life and Reigne of King Henry the IIIIHall, EdwardHenry IV, Part 1Henry IV, Part 2Henry VHenry VI, Part 3Heyward, JohnhistoriographyhistoryThe History of Henry VIIThe History of Richard IIIHolinshed, RaphaelHolinshed’s ChroniclesMore, Sir ThomasRichard IIIThe True Tragedy of King Richard IIIThe Union of the Two Illustrious FamiliesVergil, Polydoreballadcomposerscomposingcounterpointinstrumental musicmusic makingmusical instructionmusical notationsongArmadaarmyAtlantic OceanCadizchivalryFranceIrelandLow Countriesmartial culturemilitianavypeaceSpaintrained bandswaranticourtBlackfriars (playhouse)courtcourtiercourtlyEarl of PembrokeEarl of SouthamptonElizabethan EnglandHampton CourtHarbage, AlfredHerbert, WilliamInns of CourtJacobean EnglandJames IKing’s MenLord ChamberlainpatronageElizabeth IRichmond Palacerival traditionsWhitehallWriothesley, Henry
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2016

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