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7 - The Pilgrim Church

An Ongoing Journey of Ecclesial Renewal and Reform

from Part II - Conciliar Themes and Reception

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2020

Richard R. Gaillardetz
Affiliation:
Boston College, Massachusetts
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Summary

The council recovered a more eschatological understanding of the church as a pilgrim people. This emphasis on the “pilgrim” character of the church would prove among the major factors in bringing about the transformation of the self-understanding of the church, thereby providing a theological opening for the council’s program of aggiornamento. Combined with the emergence of an equally dynamic and open-ended pneumatological emphasis in conciliar ecclesiological thinking, this “eschatological turn” helped create conditions for the possibility of major ecclesial renewal and reform. This chapter will consider the emergence and development of such ecclesiological elements in the council’s vision, considering the key particular texts that specifically gave expression to this open-ended sense of the church’s life, mission, and relationship to the wider world.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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References

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Melloni, Alberto.The Beginning of the Second Period: The Great Debate on the Church.” In The Mature Council: Second Period and Intersession, September 1963–September 1964, ed. Alberigo, Giuseppe and Komonchak, Joseph A., 1115. Vol. 3 of History of Vatican II. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2000.Google Scholar
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Ruggieri, Giuseppe.Beyond an Ecclesiology of Polemics: The Debate on the Church.” In The Formation of the Council’s Identity: First Period and Intersession, October 1962–September 1963, edited by Alberigo, Giuseppe and Komonchak, Joseph A., 281357. Vol. 2 of History of Vatican II. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis Books, 2006.Google Scholar

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