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1 - Church Life in the First Half of the Twentieth Century

from Part I - Vatican II in Context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 May 2020

Richard R. Gaillardetz
Affiliation:
Boston College, Massachusetts
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Summary

Catholics before Vatican II lived in a world emotionally and even geographically apart from non-Catholics and non-believers. The church was identified as a European institution embedded in the cultures of the traditionally Catholic countries of Southern and Eastern Europe brought to North America and Australia by immigration. Highly authoritarian and hierarchically organized, the Catholic Church provided a universe largely at odds not only with Protestants but also with “modern” developments in government, sciences, and philosophy.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2020

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