Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-7ccbd9845f-s2vjv Total loading time: 1.073 Render date: 2023-01-29T07:17:23.816Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 July 2019

Lynne Magnusson
Affiliation:
University of Toronto
David Schalkwyk
Affiliation:
Queen Mary University of London
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Primary Sources

Barton, Anne, ‘Leontes and the Spider: Language and Speaker in Shakespeare’s Last Plays’, Essays, Mainly Shakespearian. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994, pp. 161181.Google Scholar
Blake, N. F., The Language of Shakespeare. New York: Macmillan, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blake, N. F., A Grammar of Shakespeare’s Language. New York: Palgrave, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, David, Think on My Words: Exploring Shakespeare’s Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ginzburg, Carlo, ‘Style: Inclusion and Exclusion’, Wooden Eyes: Nine Reflections on Distance. New York: Columbia University Press, 2001, pp. 109138.Google Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, The Authorship of Shakespeare’s Plays: A Socio-Linguistic Study. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Houston, John Porter, Shakespearian Sentences: A Study in Style and Syntax. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Kermode, Frank, Shakespeare’s Language. New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2000.Google Scholar
Magnusson, Lynne, Shakespeare and Social Dialogue: Dramatic Language and Elizabeth Letters. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare’s Late Style. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shore, Daniel, ‘Shakespeare’s Constructicon’, Shakespeare Quarterly 66.2 (2015): 113136.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van Es, Bart, Shakespeare in Company. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vickers, Brian, Shakespeare, Co-Author. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Wright, George T., Shakespeare’s Metrical Art. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.Google Scholar

Secondary Sources

Adamson, Sylvia, ‘Literary Language’, The Cambridge History of the English Language, ed. Lass, Roger. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999, vol. 3, pp. 539653.Google Scholar
Blank, Paula, Broken English: Dialects and the Politics of Language in Renaissance Writings. London: Routledge, 1996.Google Scholar
Craig, Hugh, ‘Shakespeare’s Vocabulary: Myth and Reality’, Shakespeare Quarterly 62.1 (2011): 5374.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crystal, David, Think On My Words: Exploring Shakespeare’s Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Enterline, Lynn, Shakespeare’s Schoolroom. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.Google Scholar
Leith, Dick, A Social History of English. 2nd edn. London: Routledge, 1997.Google Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Austin, J. L., How to Do Things with Words. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1975.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Calderwood, James L., Metadrama in Shakespeare’s Henriad: ‘Richard II’ to ‘Henry V’. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Cavell, Stanley, Philosophy the Day after Tomorrow. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2006.Google Scholar
Fish, Stanley E., ‘How to Do Things with Austin and Searle: Speech Act Theory and Literary Criticism’, MLN 91.5 (1976): 9831025.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kerrigan, John, Shakespeare’s Binding Language. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Porter, Joseph A., The Drama of Speech Acts: Shakespeare’s Lancastrian Tetralogy. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1979.Google Scholar
Porter, Joseph A., ‘Eloquence and Liminality: Glossing Mercutio’s Speech Acts’, Romeo and Juliet, ed. White, R. S.. Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2001, pp. 166193.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Reddy, William M., The Navigation of Feeling: A Framework for the History of Emotions. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schalkwyk, David, Speech and Performance in Shakespeare’s Sonnets and Plays. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Schalkwyk, David, ‘Shakespeare’s Speech’, Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies 40.2 (2010): 373400.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Searle, John, ‘A Classification of Speech Acts’, Language and Society 5 (1979): 123.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Searle, John, Speech Acts: An Essay in the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1969.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wofford, Susanne L.“To you I give myself, for I am yours”: Erotic Performance and Theatrical Performatives in As You Like It’, Shakespeare Reread: The Texts in New Contexts, ed. McDonald, Russ. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1994, pp. 147169.Google Scholar
Attridge, Derek, The Rhythms of English Poetry. London: Longman, 1982.Google Scholar
Attridge, Derek, Well-Weighed Syllables: Elizabethan Verse in Classical Metres. London: Cambridge University Press, 1974.Google Scholar
Crystal, David, The Oxford Dictionary of Original Shakespearean Pronunciation. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Flint, Lorna, Shakespeare’s Third Keyboard: The Significance of Rime in Shakespeare’s Plays. London: Associated University Presses, 2000.Google Scholar
Griffiths, Eric, ‘On Lines and Grooves from Shakespeare to Tennyson’, Tennyson among the Poets: Bicentenary Essays, ed. Douglas-Fairhurst, Robert and Perry, Seamus. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009, pp. 132159.Google Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Rokison, Abigail, Shakespearean Verse Speaking: Text and Theatre Practice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Smith, G. Gregory (ed.), Elizabethan Critical Essays. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1904.Google Scholar
Tarlinskaja, Marina, Shakespeare’s Verse: Iambic Pentameter and the Poet’s Idiosyncrasies. New York: Peter Lang, 1987.Google Scholar
Tarlinskaja, Marina, Shakespeare and the Versification of English Drama, 1561–1642. Farnham: Ashgate, 2014.Google Scholar
Vickers, Brian, The Artistry of Shakespeare’s Prose. London: Methuen, 1968.Google Scholar
Wright, George T., Shakespeare’s Metrical Art. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1988.Google Scholar
Bakhtin, M. M., ‘Discourse in the Novel’, The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, ed. Holquist, Michael, trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981, pp. 259422.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre, ‘The Economics of Linguistic Exchanges’, Social Science Information 16 (1977): 645668.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Brown, Penelope, and Levinson, Stephen C., Politeness: Some Universals in Language Usage. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Coulthard, Malcolm, An Introduction to Discourse Analysis. 2nd edn. London: Routledge, 1985.Google Scholar
Elam, Keir, Shakespeare’s Universe of Discourse: Language-Games in the Comedies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1984.Google Scholar
Herman, Vimala, Dramatic Discourse: Dialogue as Interaction in Plays. London and New York: Routledge, 1995.Google Scholar
Kennedy, Andrew K., Dramatic Dialogue: The Duologue of Personal Encounter. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1983.Google Scholar
Magnusson, Lynne, ‘Dialogue’, Reading Shakespeare’s Dramatic Language, ed. Adamson, Sylvia, Lynette Hunter, Lynne Magnusson, Ann Thompson, and Katie Wales. London: Arden Shakespeare, 2001, pp. 130143.Google Scholar
Magnusson, Lynne, Shakespeare and Social Dialogue: Dramatic Language and Elizabethan Letters. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Matoesian, Gregory M., ‘The Turn-Taking Model for Natural Conversation’, Reproducing Rape: Domination through Talk in the Courtroom. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993, pp. 7297.Google Scholar
Empson, William, Seven Types of Ambiguity. London: Chatto & Windus, 1930.Google Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare’s Late Style. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2006.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Morse, Ruth, Truth and Convention in the Middle Ages: Rhetoric, Representation, and Reality. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1991.Google Scholar
Aristotle, , The Art of Rhetoric, trans. R. Waterfield and H. Yunis. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018.Google Scholar
Baldwin, T. W., William Shakspere’s Small Latine and Lesse Greeke. 2 vols. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1944.Google Scholar
Barker, William, The Adages of Erasmus. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Burton, Gideon O. (ed.), Silva Rhetoricae. Brigham Young University, 2016. http://rhetoric.byu.edu.Google Scholar
Cicero, , Rhetorica ad Herennium, trans. Harry Caplan. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1954.Google Scholar
Crane, Mary Thomas, Framing Authority. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Erasmus, , De conscribendis epistolis, ed. Margolin, J. C., in Erasmus, , Opera omnia, I-2. Amsterdam: North Holland, 1971, pp. 205579, trans. Charles Fantazzi, Collected Works of Erasmus, 25. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1985.Google Scholar
Erasmus, , De copia, ed. Knott, Betty, Opera omnia, I-6. Amsterdam: North Holland, 1988. Trans. Betty Knott, Collected Works of Erasmus, 24. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1978.Google Scholar
Hutson, Lorna, Circumstantial Shakespeare. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kennedy, George A., Progymnasmata: Greek Textbooks of Prose Composition and Rhetoric. Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2003.Google Scholar
Lanham, Richard A., A Handlist of Rhetorical Terms. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1991.Google Scholar
MacDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Mack, Peter, Elizabethan Rhetoric. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mack, Peter, A History of Renaissance Rhetoric 1380–1620. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mack, Peter, ‘Learning and Transforming Conventional Wisdom: Reading and Rhetoric in the Elizabethan Grammar School’, Renaissance Studies 32 (2018): 427445.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mack, Peter, Reading and Rhetoric in Montaigne and Shakespeare. London: Bloomsbury, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mack, Peter, Rhetoric’s Questions, Reading and Interpretation. London: Palgrave, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magnusson, Lynne, Shakespeare and Social Dialogue. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Moss, Ann, Printed Commonplace-Books and the Structuring of Renaissance Thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Quintilian, , Institutio oratoria, trans. Donald A. Russell. 5 vols. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Skinner, Quentin, Forensic Shakespeare. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2014.Google Scholar
Vickers, Brian, ‘Shakespeare’s Use of Rhetoric’, A New Companion to Shakespeare Studies, ed. Muir, Kenneth and Schoenbaum, S.. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1971, pp. 8398.Google Scholar
Bakhtin, M. M., The Dialogic Imagination: Four Essays, ed. Holquist, Michael, trans. Caryl Emerson and Michael Holquist. Austin: University of Texas Press, 1981.Google Scholar
Barber, Charles, Joan C. Beal, and Philip A. Shaw, The English Language: A Historical Introduction. 2nd edn. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012.Google Scholar
Beier, Lee, ‘Anti-Language or Jargon? Canting in the English Underworld in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries’, Languages and Jargons: Contributions to a Social History of Language, ed. Burke, Peter and Porter, Roy. Cambridge: Polity Press, 1995, pp. 64101.Google Scholar
Bell, Allan, The Guidebook to Sociolinguistics. Oxford: Wiley Blackwell, 2014.Google Scholar
Blake, N. F., Non-Standard Language in English Literature. London: Deutsch, 1981.Google Scholar
Blake, N. F., Shakespeare’s Language: An Introduction. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Blake, N. F., Shakespeare’s Non-Standard English: A Dictionary of his Informal Language. New York: Continuum, 2004.Google Scholar
Blank, Paula, Broken English: Dialects and the Politics of Language in Renaissance Writing. London: Routledge, 1996.Google Scholar
Bourdieu, Pierre, Language and Symbolic Power. Cambridge: Polity, 1991.Google Scholar
Chambers, J. K., and Schilling, Natalie (eds.), The Handbook of Language Variation and Change. 2nd edn. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2013.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Delabastita, Dirk, and Hoenselaars, Ton (eds.), Multilingualism in the Drama of Shakespeare and his Contemporaries. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2015.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Edelman, Charles, Shakespeare’s Military Language: A Dictionary. London and New Brunswick: Athlone, 2000.Google Scholar
Görlach, Manfred, ‘Regional and Social Variation’, The Cambridge History of the English Language, Vol. 3: 1476–1776, ed. Lass, Roger. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999, pp. 459538.Google Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, Shakespeare and Language: Reason, Eloquence and Artifice in the Renaissance. London: Arden, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
King, Arthur H., The Language of Satirized Characters in Poetaster: A Socio-Stylistic Analysis, 1597–1602. Lund: Gleerup, 1941.Google Scholar
Morris, Pam (ed.), The Bakhtin Reader: Selected Writings of Bakhtin, Medvedev and Voloshinov. London: Edward Arnold, 1994.Google Scholar
Musgrove, S., ‘Thieves’ Cant in King Lear, English Studies 62 (1981): 513.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Salmon, Vivian, and Burness, Edwina (eds.), A Reader in the Language of Shakespearean Drama: Collected Essays. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1987.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Siemon, James, Word Against Word: Shakespearean Utterance. Amherst: University Massachusetts Press, 2002.Google Scholar
Sokol, B. J., and Sokol, Mary, Shakespeare’s Legal Language: A Dictionary. London and New Brunswick: Athlone, 2000.Google Scholar
Basu, Anupam, Hope, Jonathan, and Witmore, Michael, ‘The Professional and Linguistic Communities of Early Modern Dramatists’, Community-Making in Early Stuart Theatres: Stage and Audience, ed. Sell, Roger D., Wilcox, Helen, and Johnson, Anthony W.. London: Routledge, 2014, pp. 6394. [Pre-print downloadable from http://winedarksea.org/?page_id=1990]Google Scholar
Burkert, Mattie, ‘Plotting the “Female Wits” Controversy: Gender, Genre, and Printed Plays, 1670–1699’, Early Modern Studies after the Digital Turn, ed. Estill, Laura, Jackaki, Diane, and Ullyot, Michael. Tempe: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2016, pp. 3559.Google Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, ‘Who Invented “Gloomy”? Lies People Want to Believe about Shakespeare’, Memoria di Shakespeare 3 (2016): 2145.Google Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, and Witmore, Michael, ‘The Hundredth Psalm to the Tune of “Green Sleeves”: Digital Approaches to the Language of Genre’, Shakespeare Quarterly 61.3 (2010): 357390. [Pre-print downloadable from http://winedarksea.org/?page_id=1990]CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, and Witmore, Michael, ‘The Language of Macbeth’, Macbeth: The State of Play, ed. Thompson, Ann. London: Bloomsbury, 2014, pp. 183208. [Pre-print downloadable from http://winedarksea.org/?page_id=1990]Google Scholar
Tootalian, Jacob, ‘Without Measure: The Language of Shakespeare’s Prose’, Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 13.4 (2013): 4760.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Witmore, Michael, Hope, Jonathan, and Gleicher, Michael, ‘Digital Approaches to the Language of Shakespearean Tragedy’, The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Tragedy, ed. Neill, Michael and Schalkwyk, David. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, pp. 316335. [Pre-print downloadable from http://winedarksea.org/?page_id=1990]Google Scholar
Craig, Hugh, ‘Stylistic Analysis and Authorship Studies’, A Companion to Digital Humanities, ed. Schreibman, Susan, Siemens, Ray, and Unsworth, John. Oxford: Blackwell, 2004, pp. 273288.Google Scholar
Craig, Hugh, and Greatley-Hirsch, Brett, Style, Computers, and Early Modern Drama. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Craig, Hugh, and Kinney, Arthur F. (eds.), Shakespeare, Computers, and the Mystery of Authorship. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Elliott, Ward E. Y., and Valenza, Robert J., ‘Shakespeare’s Vocabulary: Did It Dwarf All Others?’, Stylistics and Shakespeare’s Language: Transdisciplinary Approaches, ed. Ravassat, Mireille and Culpeper, Jonathan. London: Continuum, 2011, pp. 3457.Google Scholar
Hope, Jonathan, and Witmore, Michael, ‘The Hundredth Psalm to the Tune of “Green Sleeves”: Digital Approaches to Shakespeare’s Language of Genre’, Shakespeare Quarterly 61.3 (2010): 357390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Taylor, Gary, ‘Artiginality: Authorship after Postmodernism’, The New Oxford Shakespeare: Authorship Companion, ed. Taylor, Gary and Egan, Gabriel. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, pp. 326.Google Scholar
Witmore, Michael, Hope, Jonathan, and Gleicher, Mike, ‘Digital Approaches to the Language of Shakespearean Tragedy’, The Oxford Handbook of Shakespearean Tragedy, ed. Neill, Michael and Schalkwyk, David. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016, pp. 316335.Google Scholar
Bergen, Benjamin K., Louder Than Words: The New Science of How the Mind Makes Meaning. New York: Basic Books, 2006.Google Scholar
Booth, Stephen, An Essay on Shakespeare’s Sonnets. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1969.Google Scholar
Booth, Stephen, Precious Nonsense: The Gettysburg Address, Ben Jonson’s Epitaphs on his Children, and Twelfth Night. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Cook, Amy, Shakespearean Neuroplay: Reinvigorating the Study of Dramatic Texts and Performance Through Cognitive Science. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crane, Mary Thomas, Shakespeare’s Brain: Reading with Cognitive Theory. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Freeman, Donald, ‘“Catch[ing] the Nearest Way”: Macbeth and Cognitive Metaphor’, Journal of Pragmatics 24 (1995): 689708.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lakoff, George, and Johnson, Mark, Metaphors We Live By. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1980.Google Scholar
Lyne, Raphael, Shakespeare, Rhetoric and Cognition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Smith, Bruce, The Acoustic World of Early Modern England: Attending to the O-Factor. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996.Google Scholar
Smith, Bruce, Phenomenal Shakespeare. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell, 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Barton, John, Playing Shakespeare. London: Methuen, 1984.Google Scholar
Black, James, ‘Henry IV: A World of Figures Here’, Shakespeare: The Theatrical Dimension, ed. McGuire, Philip C. and Samuelson, David A.. New York: AMS Press, 1979, pp. 165183.Google Scholar
Escolme, Bridget, Talking to the Audience: Shakespeare, Performance, Self. Abingdon: Routledge, 2005.Google Scholar
Eyre, Richard, and Wright, Nicholas, Changing Stages. London: Bloomsbury, 2000.Google Scholar
Foakes, R. A., and Rickert, R. T., Henslowe’s Diary. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1968.Google Scholar
Kermode, Frank, Shakespeare’s Language. London: Penguin, 2000.Google Scholar
Mack, Peter (ed.), Renaissance Rhetoric. London: Macmillan, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mack, Peter (ed.), Rhetoric’s Questions, Reading and Interpretation. London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Magnusson, Lynne, Shakespeare and Social Dialogue. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
McDonald, Russ, Shakespeare and the Arts of Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.Google Scholar
Rutter, Carol Chillington, ‘Shakespeare and School’, Shakespeare Beyond Doubt: Evidence, Argument, Controversy, ed. Edmondson, Paul and Wells, Stanley. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, pp. 133144.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sher, Antony, Beside Myself. London: Arrow Books, 2002.Google Scholar
Stern, Tiffany, Documents of Performance in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Walter, Harriet, Brutus and Other Heroines: Playing Shakespeare’s Roles for Women. London: Nick Hern Books, 2016.Google Scholar
Walter, Harriet, Other People’s Shoes. London: Nick Hern Books, 1999.Google Scholar
Weimann, Robert, Author’s Pen and Actor’s Voice: Playing and Writing in Shakespeare’s Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Delabastita, Dirk, and D’hulst, Lieven (eds.), European Shakespeares: Translating Shakespeare in the Romantic Age. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1993.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ewbank, Inga-Stina, ‘Shakespeare Translation as Cultural Exchange’, Shakespeare Survey 48 (1995): 112.Google Scholar
Hoenselaars, Ton, ‘Shakespeare and the Cultures of Translation’, Shakespeare Survey 66 (2013): 206219.Google Scholar
Hoenselaars, Ton, (ed.), Shakespeare and the Language of Translation. London: Arden Shakespeare, Thomson, 2004; revised edition 2012.Google Scholar
Jakobson, Roman, ‘On Linguistic Aspects of Translation’, On Translation, ed. Brower, Reuben A.. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1959, pp. 232239.Google Scholar
Kennedy, Dennis (ed.), Foreign Shakespeare: Contemporary Performance. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1993.Google Scholar
Burt, Richard, ‘To e- or not to e-? Disposing of Schlockspeare in the Age of Digital Media’, Shakespeare after Mass Media, ed. Burt, Richard. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2002, pp. 134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Drakakis, John, ‘Shakespeare in Quotations’, Studying British Culture: An Introduction, ed. Bassnett, Susan. London: Routledge, 1997, pp. 152172.Google Scholar
Garber, Marjorie, ‘Character Assassination: Shakespeare, Anita Hill, and JFK’ and ‘Shakespeare as Fetish’, Symptoms of Culture. New York: Routledge, 1998, pp. 153178.Google Scholar
Lanier, Douglas, ‘Marketing’, The Oxford Handbook to Shakespeare, ed. Kinney, Arthur. London: Oxford University Press, 2012, pp. 499515.Google Scholar
Maxwell, Julie, and Rumbold, Kate (eds.), Shakespeare and Quotation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Lynne Magnusson, University of Toronto, David Schalkwyk, Queen Mary University of London
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's Language
  • Online publication: 01 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316443668.016
Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Lynne Magnusson, University of Toronto, David Schalkwyk, Queen Mary University of London
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's Language
  • Online publication: 01 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316443668.016
Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Further Reading
  • Edited by Lynne Magnusson, University of Toronto, David Schalkwyk, Queen Mary University of London
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Shakespeare's Language
  • Online publication: 01 July 2019
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316443668.016
Available formats
×