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23 - War Outside the State

Religious Communities, Martiality, and State Formation in Early Modern South Asia

from Part IV - Featured Conflicts

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 May 2023

Margo Kitts
Affiliation:
Hawai'i Pacific University, Honolulu
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Summary

This chapter explores the role of early modern non-state actors in organized martial conflicts to understand how diverse social formations define “war” prior to the institution of the nation-state system. Exploration of how such actors interacted with states, and often operated independently of them, enhances our understanding of the multiple locations of organized violence without the assumption of state formation as a goal and allows greater appreciation of the sometimes dispersed nature of martial coercion.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

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  • War Outside the State
  • Edited by Margo Kitts, Hawai'i Pacific University, Honolulu
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Religion and War
  • Online publication: 04 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108884075.029
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  • War Outside the State
  • Edited by Margo Kitts, Hawai'i Pacific University, Honolulu
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Religion and War
  • Online publication: 04 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108884075.029
Available formats
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  • War Outside the State
  • Edited by Margo Kitts, Hawai'i Pacific University, Honolulu
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Religion and War
  • Online publication: 04 May 2023
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108884075.029
Available formats
×