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8 - Virtual Worlds from Recording to Video Games

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 August 2019

Nicholas Cook
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
Monique M. Ingalls
Affiliation:
Baylor University, Texas
David Trippett
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Summary

Music plays a significant role in both the establishment of and immersion in virtual worlds. This chapter theorises various forms of musical virtual reality, arguing that the virtual worlds of music challenge existing understandings of virtual reality and immersion. Analysing recording technology, mobile music, video games and the phenomenology of listening, the chapter argues that musical virtual reality can be theorised as an omnipresent, perpetually moving and embodied circulation of musical energy. Musical virtual reality invites a ‘drastic’ musicology that engages with the immediate, immersive and affectively powerful aspects of the listening event.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

For Further Study

Cheng, William. 2014. Sound Play: Video Games and the Musical Imagination. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Kramer, Jonathan. 1988. The Time of Music: New Meanings, New Temporalities, New Listening Strategies. New York: Schirmer.Google Scholar
Miller, Kiri. 2012. Playing Along: Digital Games, YouTube, and Virtual Performance. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
Nancy, Jean-Luc. 2007. Listening. Translated by Mandell, Charlotte. New York: Fordham University Press.Google Scholar
Van Elferen, Isabella. 2011. ‘¡Un Forastero! Issues of Virtuality and Diegesis in Videogame Music’. Music and the Moving Image 4 (2): 30–9.Google Scholar
Voegelin, Salomé. 2014. Sonic Possible Worlds: Hearing the Continuum of Sound. New York: Bloomsbury.Google Scholar

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