Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Hostname: page-component-848d4c4894-nmvwc Total loading time: 0 Render date: 2024-06-14T07:19:44.443Z Has data issue: false hasContentIssue false

2 - Interlocutors

from Part I - Life and Context

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 January 2024

Daniel Cardó
Affiliation:
St. John Theological Seminary, Denver
Uwe Michael Lang
Affiliation:
St Mary's University, London
Get access

Summary

Chapter 2 discusses Ratzinger’s engagement with thinkers both as collaborators and as contenders in academic and ecclesial debates.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2023

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Further Reading

Boersma, Hans, Nouvelle Théologie and Sacramental Ontology: A Return to Mystery (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).Google Scholar
De Lubac, Henri, At the Service of the Church: Henri de Lubac Reflects on the Circumstances That Occasioned His Writings, trans. Anne Englund (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1993).Google Scholar
Flynn, Gabriel and Murray, Paul D. (eds.), Ressourcement: A Movement for Renewal in Twentieth Century Catholic Theology (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012).Google Scholar
Kerr, Fergus, Twentieth-Century Catholic Theologians: From Neoscholasticism to Nuptial Mysticism (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing, 2007).Google Scholar
Rowland, Tracey, Ratzinger’s Faith: The Theology of Pope Benedict XVI (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).Google Scholar
Wicks, Jared, Investigating Vatican II: Its Theologians, Ecumenical Turn, and Biblical Commitment (Washington, DC: The Catholic University of America Press, 2018).Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×