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6 - Crucifixion

from Part I - The Jesus of history

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 May 2006

Markus Bockmuehl
Affiliation:
University of Cambridge
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Summary

Why did Jesus have to die? This question is capable of multiple answers. For example, a Latin historian writing at the end of the reign of Tiberius likely would never have heard of Jesus or his execution; or if he had, he would probably have had no reason to mention it. Had he woven this crucifixion into his narrative, the most credible impetus would have been to illustrate the religio-political agitation that marked Roman-Jewish relations during this period, perhaps as an anecdote displaying how Rome dealt with those who threatened the pax romana. If reports of this incident were written up differently in the second century, or if already within the first century those who penned documents that would become our New Testament had relocated it from a footnote in the annals of history to its status as an epochmaking event, this is because Jesus' death had been set within different interpretative horizons.

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2001

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  • Crucifixion
  • Edited by Markus Bockmuehl, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Jesus
  • Online publication: 28 May 2006
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521792614.007
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  • Crucifixion
  • Edited by Markus Bockmuehl, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Jesus
  • Online publication: 28 May 2006
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521792614.007
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • Crucifixion
  • Edited by Markus Bockmuehl, University of Cambridge
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Jesus
  • Online publication: 28 May 2006
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/CCOL0521792614.007
Available formats
×