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Further Reading

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 June 2021

Frans De Bruyn
Affiliation:
University of Ottawa
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Print publication year: 2021

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Montagu, Elizabeth. Essays on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare, London, 1769.Google Scholar
Parson, J. W. Hints on Producing Genius, London, 1790.Google Scholar
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Pope, Alexander. An Essay on Criticism, London, 1711.Google Scholar
Purshouse, A. An Essay on Genius, London, 1782.Google Scholar
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Reynolds, Joshua. Discourses on Art, London, 1797.Google Scholar
Rylands, John. Select Essays on Moral Virtue, Genius, Science, and Taste, London, 1792.Google Scholar
Ashfield, Andrew, and de Bolla, Peter, eds. The Sublime: A Reader in British Eighteenth-Century Aesthetic Theory, Cambridge University Press, 1996.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Bourdieu, Pierre. ‘The Historical Genesis of a Pure Aesthetic’, in The Field of Cultural Production: Essays on Art and Literature, Cambridge: Polity Press, 1993, 254–66.Google Scholar
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Hipple, W. The Beautiful, the Sublime, and the Picturesque in Eighteenth-Century Aesthetic Theory, Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, 1967.Google Scholar
Hirst, Paul H. ‘Aesthetic Education’, in A Companion to Aesthetics, ed. Cooper, David, Oxford: Blackwell, 1995, 128–9.Google Scholar
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Clarke, Samuel. A Demonstration of the Being and Attributes of God and Other Writings, ed. Vailati, Ezio, Cambridge University Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Cockburn, Catharine Trotter. Philosophical Writings, ed. Sheridan, Patricia, Peterborough, on: Broadview Press, 2006.Google Scholar
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Hartley, David. Observations on Man: His Frame, His Duty, and His Expectations, 2 vols., New York: Garland, 1971.Google Scholar
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Hume, David An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals: A Critical Edition, ed. Beauchamp, Tom L., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1998.Google Scholar
Hume, David A Treatise of Human Nature: A Critical Edition, ed. Norton, David Fate and Norton, Mary, 2 vols., Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2007.Google Scholar
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Mandeville, Bernard The Grumbling Hive: or, Knaves Turn’d Honest, London, 1705; reprinted in
Perry, John, ed. Personal Identity. Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1975.Google Scholar
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Schneewind, J. B., ed. Moral Philosophy from Montaigne to Kant: An Anthology, 2 vols., Cambridge University Press, 1990.Google Scholar
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