Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-55597f9d44-vkn6t Total loading time: 0.234 Render date: 2022-08-14T04:39:26.486Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

5 - The primacy of practice in Dewey’s experimental empiricism

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  28 September 2010

Molly Cochran
Affiliation:
Georgia Institute of Technology
Get access

Summary

Dewey explained that the title of the book setting out his mature philosophy, Experience and Nature, was intended to signify to readers that what he was offering could be thought of either as “empirical naturalism or naturalistic empiricism.” He anticipated that many would greet either of these as an oxymoron - “like talking of a round square” - because their conception of nature was of “something wholly material and mechanistic,” which had no place for experience except “as something extraneous, which is occasionally superimposed on nature.” Among existing philosophies that professed to base their concepts and doctrines on experience and could claim to be versions of “empiricism,” none conceived experience as a natural phenomenon like rain, retro-viruses or retrograde motion of the planets. But even now, after the concept of a “naturalized epistemology” has become commonplace, the concept of experience on which Dewey hoped to base his naturalized empiricism is not widely appreciated, let alone accepted. Locating experience as in and a part of nature was only a relatively modest part of the radical reform Dewey was proposing.

Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)
3
Cited by

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×