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5 - US Constitutional Law and History

from Part II - Historical Experiences

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2019

Roger Masterman
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Robert Schütze
Affiliation:
University of Durham
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Summary

Although the US Constitution is quite short, it is also quite old. The structures it called forth – including the presidency, the bicameral Congress, the Supreme Court – survive, even as their relationships have evolved. Its brief provisions have also spawned a complex body of jurisprudence on many issues that has shifted over more than two centuries; there are now more than 560 volumes of the official ‘US Reports’, that is, of cases decided by the US Supreme Court.1

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Thayer, J.B., ‘The Origin and Scope of the American Doctrine of Constitutional Law’ (1893) 7 Harv. L. Rev. 129.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wechsler, H., ‘The Political Safeguards of Federalism: The Role of the States in the Composition and Selection of the National Government’ (1954) 54 Colum. L. Rev. 543.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

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