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1 - Comparative Methodologies

from Part I - Theoretical Foundations

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  30 September 2019

Roger Masterman
Affiliation:
University of Durham
Robert Schütze
Affiliation:
University of Durham
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Summary

From its beginnings as a relatively obscure and exotic subject studied by a devoted few, comparative constitutionalism has developed into one of the more vibrant and exciting subjects in contemporary legal scholarship, and has become a cornerstone of constitutional jurisprudence and constitution-making in an increasing number of countries worldwide. This tremendous renaissance in comparative constitutional inquiry reflects a confluence of factors. Chief among them are extensive democratization and constitutionalization trends worldwide; the internalization of the legal profession and of legal education; and the rise of communication and information technologies that facilitate considerably the diffusion of constitutional concepts, and foster cross-national jurisprudential dialogue. The result has been an ever-expanding interest among scholars, judges, practitioners and policymakers in the transnational migration of constitutional ideas, and in the comparative study of constitutions and constitutionalism more generally.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2019

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References

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Meuwese, A. and Versteeg, M., ‘Quantitative Methods for Comparative Constitutional Law’, in Adams, Maurice and Bomhoff, Jacco (eds.), Practice and Theory in Comparative Law (Cambridge University Press, 2012), 230256.Google Scholar
Reimann, M., ‘Comparative Law and Neighboring Disciplines’, in Bussani, Mauro and Mattei, Ugo (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Comparative Law (Cambridge University Press, 2012), 1334.Google Scholar
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