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Part I - The Classical Period

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 May 2022

Steven Katz
Affiliation:
Boston University
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Print publication year: 2022

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References

Chazan, R., From Anti-Judaism to Anti-Semitism: Ancient and Medieval Christian Constructions of Jewish History (Cambridge, 2016). Confines itself largely to early Christian and medieval attitudes toward Jews but makes a useful distinction between anti-Judaism and antisemitism.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Stoyanov, Y., “Apoctalypticizing Warfare from Political Theology to Imperial Eschatology in Seventh and Early Eighth-Century Byzantium,” in The Armenian Apocalyptic Tradition, ed. Bardakjian, K. B. and La Porta, S. (Leiden, 2014), 379433. Gives further analysis of propaganda during Zoroastrian and Muslim invasions.Google Scholar
Van Bekkum, W., “Jewish Messianic Expectations in the Age of Heraclius,” in The Reign of Heraclius (610–641), 95–112.Google Scholar

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  • The Classical Period
  • Edited by Steven Katz, Boston University
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Antisemitism
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108637725.002
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  • The Classical Period
  • Edited by Steven Katz, Boston University
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Antisemitism
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108637725.002
Available formats
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Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

  • The Classical Period
  • Edited by Steven Katz, Boston University
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Antisemitism
  • Online publication: 05 May 2022
  • Chapter DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/9781108637725.002
Available formats
×