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Part V - Politics

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2021

Jenifer Neils
Affiliation:
American School of Classical Studies, Athens
Dylan K. Rogers
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Further Reading

A few overviews of Athens’ associations and their role in the polis have appeared relatively recently. Jones 1999 (a seminal work) marshals the evidence in support of a number of interesting and original hypotheses, though not all of these have found ready acceptance. Ismard 2010 is a magisterial overview of the evidence within a stimulating, if sometimes somewhat complex, theoretical framework. Johnstone 2011 is an idiosyncratic, independent-minded, and highly original discussion of a range of Athenian groups and institutions. Kierstead 2013 investigates the role that associations might have played in building up trust, dispersing authority, and hence in sustaining the democracy.

For individual associations, there is still much to be learned from the standard works, even if some appear dated. These are Whitehead 1986 on demes, Lambert 1993 on phratries, Bourriot 1976 on gene, Ferguson 1944 on orgeones (still influential), and Calhoun 1913 on hetaireiai (still valuable, especially for these groups’ political activities). Roussel 1976 (along with Bourriot 1976) played a key role in overturning an older view of associations as holdovers from an atavistic past, presenting them instead as part and parcel of the developing polis. The debate over Athens’ associations, their nature, and their relationship with the democracy continues unabated. Scholars currently active in this field include Stephen Lambert, Josine Blok, Claire Taylor, Alex Gottesman, Sara Wijma, Ilias Arnaoutoglou, Nikolaos Papazarkadas, Vincent Gabrielsen, and several others.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Blok, J., and Lambert, S. 2009. “The Appointment of Priests in Attic Gene.” ZPE 169: 95121.Google Scholar
Bourriot, F. 1976. Recherches sur la nature du génos. Étude d’histoire sociale athénienne. Périodes archaïque et classique. Lille.Google Scholar
Calhoun, G.M. 1913. Athenian Clubs in Politics and Litigation. Austin.Google Scholar
Ferguson, W.S. 1944. “The Attic Orgeones.” Harvard Theological Review 37: 61140.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ismard, P. 2010. La cité des réseaux: Athènes et ses associations, VIe–Ie siècle av. J.-C. Paris.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Johnstone, S. 2011. A History of Trust in Ancient Greece. Chicago.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jones, N.F. 1987. Public Organization in Ancient Greece: A Documentary Study. Philadelphia.Google Scholar
Jones, N.F. 1999. The Associations of Classical Athens: The Response of Democracy. Oxford.Google Scholar
Kierstead, J.C. 2013. “A Community of Communities: Associations and Democracy in Classical Athens.” PhD dissertation, Stanford University.Google Scholar
Kierstead, J.C. 2018. “Incentives and Information in Athenian Citizenship Procedures.” Historia 68: 2649.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kierstead, J.C. Forthcoming. “Non-Citizens in Athenian Associations.” In New Approaches to Greek Institutional History, ed. Canevaro, M., Edinburgh.Google Scholar
Lambert, S.D. 1993. The Phratries of Attica. Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
Lynch, J.P. 1972. Aristotle’s School: A Study of a Greek Educational Institution. Berkeley.Google Scholar
Osborne, M.J. 1981. Naturalization in Athens. Brussels.Google Scholar
Paga, J. 2010. “Mapping Politics: An Investigation of Deme Theatres in the Fifth and Fourth Centuries bce.” Hesperia 79: 351384.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Parker, R. 1996. Athenian Religion: A History. Oxford.Google Scholar
Roussel, D. 1976. Tribu et cité. Étude sur les groupes sociaux dans les cités grecques aux époques archaïque et classique. Paris.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Samons, L.J. 2000. Empire of the Owl: Athenian Imperial Finance. Stuttgart.Google Scholar
Sealey, R. 1987. The Athenian Republic: Democracy or the Rule of Law? Berkeley.Google Scholar
Whitehead, D. 1986. The Demes of Attika, 508/7–ca. 250 bc: A Political and Social Study. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

The major sources for Athenian law are the Constitution of the Athenians and the Attic orators; see especially Canevaro 2013. On democracy and the rule of law, see Harris 2006 and 2013. For a detailed treatment of Athenian legal procedure, see Harrison 1971, although some of the details are out of date. MacDowell 1978 is a basic introduction to Athenian law and legal procedure. For a review of recent scholarship on ancient Greek law, see Harris 2018.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Boegehold, A. 1995. The Lawcourts at Athens: Sites, Buildings, Equipment, Procedure, and Testimonia. Agora 28. Princeton.Google Scholar
Canevaro, M. 2013. The Documents in the Attic Orators: Laws and Decrees in the Public Speeches of the Demosthenic Corpus. Oxford.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dow, S. 1939. “Aristotle, the Kleroteria, and the Courts.” Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 50: 134.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, E.M. 2006. Democracy and the Rule of Law in Classical Athens. Essays on Law, Society, and Politics. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, E.M. 2013. The Rule of Law in Action in Democratic Athens. Oxford.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Harris, E.M. 2015. “The Family, the Community, and Murder: The Role of Pollution in Athenian Homicide Law.” In Public and Private in Ancient Mediterranean Law and Religion, eds. Ando, C. and Rüpke, J., Berlin, 1135.Google Scholar
Harris, E.M. 2016. “From Democracy to the Rule of Law? Constitutional Change in Fourth Century bce Athens.” In Die Athenische Demokratie im 4. Jahrhundert: zwischen Modernisierung und Tradition, ed. Tiersche, C., Stuttgart, 7387.Google Scholar
Harris, E.M. 2018. “Some Recent Developments in the Study of Ancient Greek Law.” Journal of Ancient Civilizations 33: 187266.Google Scholar
Harrison, A.R.W. 1971. The Law of Athens: Procedure. Oxford.Google Scholar
Kroll, J.H. 1972. Athenian Bronze Allotment Plates. Cambridge, MA.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
MacDowell, D.M. 1978. The Law in Classical Athens. London.Google Scholar
Sickinger, J.P. 2004. “The Laws of Athens: Publication, Preservation and Consultation.” In The Law and the Courts in Ancient Greece, eds. Harris, E.M. and Rubinstein, L., London, 93109.Google Scholar
Young, S.H. 1939. “An Athenian Klepsydra.” Hesperia 8: 274284.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

This chapter summarizes Pritchard 2019, 28–137, where many of the specific sources from the playwrights and the orators can be found. For more on the hoplites, see Christ 2001 and Crowley 2012. On the horsemen, see Bugh 1988, Spence 1993, and Pritchard 2018b. For the archers, see Trundle 2010, 145–152, and Pritchard 2018a. On naval personnel, see Gabrielsen 1994 and Pritchard 2018c. For depictions of warfare on Athenian vases, see Oakley 2020, 167–188.

Bibliography

Bugh, G.R. 1988. The Horsemen of Athens. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Christ, M.R. 2001. “Conscription of Hoplites in Classical Athens.” CQ 51: 398422.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Crowley, J. 2012. The Psychology of the Athenian Hoplite: The Culture of Combat in Classical Athens. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Gabrielsen, V. 1994. Financing the Athenian Fleet: Public Taxation and Social Relations. Baltimore.Google Scholar
Hansen, M.H. 1986. Demography and Democracy: The Number of Athenian Citizens in the Fourth Century bc. Herning.Google Scholar
Hansen, M.H. 1991. The Athenian Democracy in the Age of Demosthenes: Structure, Principles, and Ideology. Cambridge, MA.Google Scholar
Meiggs, R., and Lewis, D.M.. 1988. A Selection of Greek Historical Inscriptions to the End of the Fifth Century bc. Rev. edn. Oxford.Google Scholar
Oakley, J.H. 2020. A Guide to Scenes of Daily Life on Athenian Vases. Madison.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2010. “The Symbiosis between Democracy and War: The Case of Ancient Athens.” In War, Democracy, and Culture in Classical Athens, ed. Pritchard, D.M., Cambridge, 162.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2015. Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens. Austin.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2018a. “The Archers of Classical Athens.” Greece & Rome 65: 86102.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2018b. “The Horsemen of Classical Athens: Some Considerations on Their Recruitment and Social Background.” Athenaeum 106: 405419.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2018c. “The Standing of Sailors in Democratic Athens.” Dialogues d’histoire ancienne 44: 231253.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2019. Athenian Democracy at War. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Spence, I.G. 1993. The Cavalry of Classical Greece: A Social and Military History with Particular Reference to Athens. Oxford.Google Scholar
Trundle, M. 2010. “Light Troops in Classical Athens.” In War, Democracy, and Culture in Classical Athens, ed. Pritchard, D.M., Cambridge, 139160.Google Scholar
Van Wees, H. 2001. “The Myth of the Middle-Class Army: Military and Social Status in Ancient Greece.” In War as a Cultural and Social Force: Essays on Warfare in Antiquity, eds. Bekker-Nielsen, T. and Hannestad, L., Copenhagen, 4571.Google Scholar

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  • Politics
  • Edited by Jenifer Neils, American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Dylan K. Rogers, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens
  • Online publication: 10 March 2021
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  • Politics
  • Edited by Jenifer Neils, American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Dylan K. Rogers, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens
  • Online publication: 10 March 2021
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  • Politics
  • Edited by Jenifer Neils, American School of Classical Studies, Athens, Dylan K. Rogers, University of Virginia
  • Book: The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Athens
  • Online publication: 10 March 2021
Available formats
×