Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5959bf8d4d-km8cc Total loading time: 0.956 Render date: 2022-12-09T10:42:33.620Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "useRatesEcommerce": false } hasContentIssue true

Part IV - Culture and Sport

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 March 2021

Jenifer Neils
Affiliation:
American School of Classical Studies, Athens
Dylan K. Rogers
Affiliation:
University of Virginia
Get access

Summary

Image of the first page of this content. For PDF version, please use the ‘Save PDF’ preceeding this image.'
Type
Chapter
Information
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

Further Reading

Rihll 2003 discusses the general dynamics of teaching and learning in ancient Athens, while Natali 2003 and Haake 2010 offer short overviews of the philosophical schools’ topography and practices. On their various doctrines, see Long and Sedley 1987; on sculpted representations of philosophers, see Zanker 1995; on images of education on Athenian vases, see Oakley 2020, 103–112. For particulars regarding Plato’s Academy, consult Caruso 2013 and Kalligas et al. 2020; for Aristotle and the Lyceum, Natali 2013. Clay 2009 examines Epicurus’ Garden, and Kechagia 2010 the Stoa.

Bibliography

Camp, J.M. 2007. “Excavations in the Athenian Agora: 2002–2007.” Hesperia 76: 627663.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Camp, J.M. 2015. “Excavations in the Athenian Agora: 2008–2012.” Hesperia 84: 467513.Google Scholar
Caruso, A. 2013. Akademia: Archeologia di una scuola filosofica ad Atene da Platone a Proclo (387 a.C.–485 d.C.). Athens.Google Scholar
Clay, D. 2009. “The Athenian Garden.” In The Cambridge Companion to Epicureanism, ed. Warren, J., Cambridge, 928.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Dillon, J. 2003. The Heirs of Plato: A Study of the Old Academy. Oxford.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Haake, M. 2010. “Philosophical Schools in Athenian Society from the Fourth to the First Century bc: An Overview.” In Private Associations and the Public Sphere, eds. Gabrielsen, V. and Thomsen, C., Copenhagen, 5791.Google Scholar
Jones, N.F. 1999. The Associations of Classical Athens: The Response of Democracy. Oxford.Google Scholar
Kalligas, P., Balla, C., Baziotopoulou-Valavani, E., and Karasmanis, V., eds. 2020. Plato’s Academy: Its Workings and Its History. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kechagia, E. 2010. “Rethinking a Professional Rivalry: Early Epicureans against the Stoa.” CQ 60: 132155.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Leiwo, M., and Remes, P.. 1999. “Partnership of Citizens and Metics: The Will of Epicurus.” CQ 49: 161166.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Long, A.A., and Sedley, D.. 1987. The Hellenistic Philosophers. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Lygouri-Tolia, E. 2002. “Excavating an Ancient Palaestra in Athens.” In Excavating Classical Culture: Recent Archaeological Discoveries in Greece, eds. Stamatopoulou, M. and Yeroulanou, M., Oxford, 203212.Google Scholar
Montiglio, S. 2000. “Wandering Philosophers in Classical Greece.” JHS 120: 86105.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Natali, C. 2003. “Schools and Sites of Learning.” In The Greek Pursuit of Knowledge, eds. Brunschwig, J. and Lloyd, G.E.R., Cambridge, MA, 4066.Google Scholar
Natali, C. 2013. Aristotle: His Life and School, ed. Hutchinson, D.S., Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Oakley, J.H. 2020. A Guide to Scenes of Daily Life on Athenian Vases. Madison.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
O’Sullivan, L. 2002. “The Law of Sophocles and the Beginnings of Permanent Philosophical Schools in Athens.” Rheinisches Museum für Philologie 145: 251262.Google Scholar
Rihll, T.E. 2003. “Teaching and Learning in Classical Athens.” Greece & Rome 50: 168190.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Ritchie, C.E. 1989. “The Lyceum, the Garden of Theophrastus, and the Garden of the Muses: A Topographical Re-Evaluation.” In Φίλια έπη εις Γεώργιον Ε. Μυκωνάν δια τα 60 έτη του ανασκαφικού του έργου, Τομος Γ’, Athens, 250260.Google Scholar
Watts, E. 2007. “Creating the Academy: Historical Discourse and the Shape of Community in the Old Academy.” JHS 127: 106122.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wycherley, R.E. 1961. “Peripatos: The Athenian Philosophical Scene – I.” Greece & Rome 8: 152163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Zanker, P. 1995. The Mask of Socrates: The Image of the Intellectual in Antiquity. Berkeley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

This chapter summarizes Pritchard 2013. The other monograph on Athenian athletics is the still indispensable Kyle 1987. On Greek athletics in general, see Phillips and Pritchard 2003, Miller 2004, and Christesen and Kyle 2014. For images of sport on Athenian vases, see Oakley 2020, 131–166. On Athenian competitive festivals, see Osborne 1993. For the most thorough treatment of the Great Panathenaia, see Shear 2021.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Christesen, P., and Kyle, D.G., eds. 2014. A Companion to Sport and Spectacle in Greek and Roman Antiquity. Malden, MA.Google Scholar
Csapo, E., and Slater, W.J.. 1994. The Context of Ancient Drama. Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
Kyle, D.G. 1987. Athletics in Ancient Athens. Leiden.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lissarrague, F. 1990. L’autre guerrier: archers, peltastes, cavaliers dans l’imagerie attique. Paris.Google Scholar
Loraux, N. 2018. “The ‘Beautiful Death’ from Homer to Democratic Athens.” Arethusa 51: 7389.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lüschen, G. 1970. “The Interdependence of Sport and Culture.” In The Cross-Cultural Analysis of Sport and Games, ed. Lüschen, G., Champaign, 8599.Google Scholar
Miller, S.G. 2004. Ancient Greek Athletics. London.Google Scholar
Oakley, J.H. 2020. A Guide to Scenes of Daily Life on Athenian Vases. Madison.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Osborne, R. 1993. “Competitive Festivals and the Polis: A Context for the Dramatic Festivals at Athens.” In Tragedy, Comedy and the Polis: Papers from the Greek Drama Conference, Nottingham, 18–20 July 1990, eds. Sommerstein, A.H., Halliwell, S., Henderson, J., and Zimmermann, B., Bari, 2138.Google Scholar
Phillips, D.J., and Pritchard, D.M., eds. 2003. Sport and Festival in the Ancient Greek World. Swansea.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2013. Sport, Democracy, and War in Classical Athens. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2015. Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens. Austin.Google Scholar
Pritchard, D.M. 2019. Athenian Democracy at War. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Shear, J.L. 2021. Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Sipes, R.G. 1973. “War, Sport, and Aggression.” American Anthropologist 75: 6486.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sommerstein, A.H. 1996. “How to Avoid Being a Komodoumenos.” CQ 46: 327356.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Vernant, J.-P. 1988. Myth and Society in Ancient Greece. Trans. Lloyd, J.. New York.Google Scholar

Further Reading

The literature on this topic is rich and mainly in German and modern Greek. The problem of the ‘old agora’ and the topography of earlier Athens is analyzed in Miller 1995 (especially 218–219). Of the vast bibliography about the origins of drama, see Csapo and Slater 1994, 79–138, 286–301; Green 1994, especially 16–48; Connor 1996; Sourvinou-Inwood 2003, 141–172; Csapo and Miller 2007, 1–38; Kowalzig and Wilson 2013. Wiles 2000 is a good introduction to the art of Greek theater performance. On the Theater of Dionysos, in addition to the classic Pickard-Cambridge 1946, a recent presentation of the wooden theater can be found in Moretti 1999–2000 and in Papastamati-von Moock 2015, while for the Lycurgan phase, Papastamati-von Moock 2014 is very useful. On the Odeion of Perikles, see Robkin 1976; Miller 1997, 218–242; Shear 2016, 197–228 (for a discussion within the wider framework of Perikles’ building activity). For a discussion of the theatrical spaces of Athens and Attika in the Roman period, see Di Napoli 2013, 7–25.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Connor, W.R. 1996. “Civil Society, Dionysiac Festival, and the Athenian Democracy.” In Démokratia: A Conversation on Democracies, Ancient and Modern, eds. Ober, J. and Hedrick, C., Princeton, 217226.Google Scholar
Csapo, E., and Miller, M.C., eds. 2007. The Origins of the Theater in Ancient Greece and Beyond. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Csapo, E., and Slater, W.J.. 1994. The Context of Ancient Drama. Ann Arbor.Google Scholar
Di Napoli, V. 2013. Teatri della Grecia romana: forma, decorazione, funzioni. La provincia d’Acaia. Athens.Google Scholar
Greco, E., ed. 2010. Topografia di Atene. Sviluppo urbano e monumenti dalle origini al III secolo d.C. Tomo I: Acropoli – Areopago – Tra Acropoli e Pnice. Athens.Google Scholar
Green, J.R. 1994. Theater in Ancient Greek Society. London.Google Scholar
Kowalzig, B., and Wilson, P., eds. 2013. Dithyramb in Context. Oxford.Google Scholar
Ma, J. 2015. “The Portrait of Menander in the Theatre of Dionysus and Its Neighbours.” Studi Ellenistici 29: 235239.Google Scholar
Miller, M.C. 1997. Athens and Persia in the Fifth Century bc: A Study in Cultural Receptivity. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Miller, S.G. 1995. “Architecture as Evidence for the Identity of the Early Polis.” In Sources for the Ancient Greek City-State, Symposium 1994, ed. Hansen, M.H., Copenhagen, 210244.Google Scholar
Moretti, J.-C. 1999–2000. “The Theater of the Sanctuary of Dionysos Eleuthereus in Late Fifth-Century Athens.” Illinois Classical Studies 24–25: 377398.Google Scholar
Papastamati-von Moock, C. 2014. “The Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus in Athens: New Data and Observations on Its ‘Lycurgan’ Phase.” In Greek Theatre in the Fourth Century bc, ed. Csapo, Ε., Goette, H.R., Green, R., and Wilson, P., Berlin, 1576.Google Scholar
Papastamati-von Moock, C. 2015. “The Wooden Theatre of Dionysos Eleuthereus in Athens: Old Issues, New Research.” In The Architecture of the Ancient Greek Theatre, Acts of an International Conference, Athens 2012, eds. Frederiksen, R., Gebhard, E., and Sokolicek, A., Aarhus, 3979.Google Scholar
Pickard-Cambridge, A.W. 1946. Τhe Theatre of Dionysus in Athens. Oxford.Google Scholar
Robkin, A.L.H. 1976. “The Odeion of Perikles: Some Observations on Its History, Form, and Functions.” PhD dissertation, University of Washington.Google Scholar
Shear, T.L. 2016. Trophies of Victory: Public Buildings in Periklean Athens. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Sourvinou-Inwood, C. 2003. Tragedy and Athenian Religion. Lanham.Google Scholar
Wiles, D. 2000. Greek Theatre Performance. An Introduction. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

The literature on these subjects is vast; a good place to start is Parker 2005. Attic processions are the subject of chapters in Friese 2019. Mylonas 1961 is still the locus classicus for the site of Eleusis, now supplemented by the extensive work of Clinton, in particular Clinton 1992 and 2005/2008. On the nature and modern study of Mystery religions, see Cosmopoulos 2003 and Bremmer 2014. For the argument that the ritual dates back to the Bronze Age, see Cosmopoulos 2015. The City Eleusinion is thoroughly published by Miles 1998. For a general overview of the Panathenaia, see Neils 1992 and 1996, and Neils and Tracy 2003; more comprehensive is Shear 2021. For discussion of the Telesterion and the Odeion of Perikles, see Shear 2016.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Bremmer, J. 2014. Initiation into the Mysteries of the Ancient World. Berlin.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Clinton, K. 1992. Myth and Cult: The Iconography of the Eleusinian Mysteries. Stockholm.Google Scholar
Clinton, K. 2005/2008. Eleusis. The Inscriptions on Stone: Documents of the Sanctuary of the Two Goddesses and Public Documents of the Deme. 2 vols. Athens.Google Scholar
Cosmopoulos, M. 2015. Bronze Age Eleusis and the Origins of the Eleusinian Mysteries. Cambridge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cosmopoulos, M. ed. 2003. Greek Mysteries. The Archaeology and Ritual of Ancient Secret Cults. London.Google Scholar
Friese, W., et al., eds. 2019. Ascending and Descending the Akropolis: Movement in Athenian Religion. Aarhus.Google Scholar
Miles, M.M. 1998. The City Eleusinion. Agora 31. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miles, M.M. 2012. “Entering Demeter’s Gateway: The Roman Propylon in the City Eleusinion.” In Architecture of the Sacred: Space, Ritual, and Experience from Classical Greece to Byzantium, eds. Wescoat, B.D. and Ousterhout, R.G., Cambridge, 114151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Mylonas, G. 1961. Eleusis and the Eleusinian Mysteries. Princeton.Google Scholar
Neils, J. 2001. The Parthenon Frieze. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Neils, J. ed. 1992. Goddess and Polis: The Panathenaic Festival in Athens. Princeton.Google Scholar
Neils, J. ed. 1996. Worshipping Athena: Panathenaia and Parthenon. Madison.Google Scholar
Neils, J., and Schultz, P.. 2012. “Erechtheus and the Apobates Race on the Parthenon Frieze (North XI–XII).” AJA 116: 195207.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Neils, J., and Tracy, S.. 2003. The Games at Athens. Agora Picture Book 25. Princeton.Google Scholar
Parker, R. 2005. Athenian Religion: A History. Oxford.Google Scholar
Rogers, D.K. 2021. “Sensing Water in Roman Greece: The Villa of Herodes Atticus at Eva-Loukou and the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore at Eleusis.” AJA 125.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Shear, J.L. 2021. Serving Athena: The Festival of the Panathenaia and the Construction of Athenian Identities. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Shear, T.L. 2016. Trophies of Victory: Public Buildings in Periklean Athens. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wachsmann, S. 2012. “Panathenaic Ships: The Iconographic Evidence.” Hesperia 81: 237266.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

To set ancient Athenian eating and drinking in a wider Mediterranean context, see Wilkins and Nadeau 2015. Dietler and Hayden 2001 provide theoretical background on communal feasting from a broad anthropological perspective. The seminal work on the ancient Greek symposion remains Murray 1990. Van den Eijnde et al. 2018 presents many facets of the history and impact of communal dining on the development of the polis in general. Glazebrook and Tsakirgis 2016 offers several case studies covering eating and drinking at Athenian taverns and brothels. The perceived relationship between ancient Greek diet and health is covered in Jouanna 2012, while Papathanasiou et al. 2015 provides an analysis of the physical evidence for nutrition in ancient Greece. Wilkins 2000 analyzes thoroughly the central role of food and eating as revealed in publicly performed comedies. Finally, Davidson 1998 explores how eating and drinking in combination with sexual behaviors are defining aspects of Athenian culture.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Blok, J., and Van ‘t Wout, E.. 2018. “Table Arrangements: Sitêsis as a Polis Institution.” In Feasting and Polis Institutions, ed. Van den Eijnde, F. et al., Leiden, 181204.Google Scholar
Bowie, A. 1997. “Thinking with Drinking: Wine and the Symposium in Aristophanes.” JHS 117: 121.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Cooper, F., and Morris, S.. 1990. “Dining in Round Buildings.” In Sympotica, ed. Murray, O., Oxford, 6685.Google Scholar
Davidson, J.N. 1998. Courtesans and Fishcakes: The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens. New York.Google Scholar
Dietler, M., and Hayden, B.. 2001. Feasts: Archaeological and Ethnographic Perceptions on Food, Politics, and Power. Washington, DC.Google Scholar
Dalby, A. 1993. “Food and Sexuality in Classical Athens.” In Food, Culture, & History. Vol. I, eds. Mars, G. and Mars, V., London, 165190.Google Scholar
Foxhall, L. 2007. “House Clearance: Unpacking the ‘Kitchen’ in Classical Greece.” In Building Communities: House, Settlement, and Society in the Aegean and Beyond, eds. Westgate, R., Fisher, N., and Whitley, J., London, 233242.Google Scholar
Glazebrook, A., and Tsakirgis, B., eds. 2016. Houses of Ill Repute: The Archaeology of Brothels, Houses, and Taverns in the Greek World. Philadelphia.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Jouanna, J. 2012. Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen: Selected Papers by Jacques Jouanna, ed. Van der Eijk, P., Leiden.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kavvadias, G., and Matthaiou, A.P.. 2014. “A New Attic Inscription of the Fifth Century bc from the East Slope of the Acropolis.” In Αθηναίων επίσκοπος: Studies in Honour of Harold B. Mattingly, eds. Matthaiou, A.P. and Pitt, R.K., Athens, 5172.Google Scholar
Lagia, A. 2015. “Diet and the Polis: An Isotopic Study of Diet in Athens and Laurion during the Classical, Hellenistic, and Imperial Roman Periods.” In Archaeodiet in the Greek World: Dietary Reconstruction from Stable Isotope Analysis, eds. Papathanasiou, A. et al., Princeton, 119145.Google Scholar
Lawall, M.L. 2000. “Graffiti, Wine Selling, and the Reuse of Amphoras in the Athenian Agora, ca. 430–400 bc.” Hesperia 69: 390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lewis, D.M. 2016. “Commodities in Classical Athens: The Evidence of Old Comedy.” In The Ancient Greek Economy: Markets, Households, and City-States, ed. Harris, E. et al., Cambridge, 381398.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Lynch, K.M. 2013. The Symposium in Context: Pottery from a Late Archaic House near the Athenian Agora. Princeton.Google Scholar
MacKinnon, M. 2014. “Animals, Economics, and Culture in the Athenian Agora: Comparative Zooarchaeological Investigations.” Hesperia 83: 189255.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Miller, S.G. 1978. The Prytaneion: Its Function and Architectural Form. Berkeley.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Murray, O. 1990. Sympotica: A Symposium on the Symposium. Oxford.Google Scholar
Papathanasiou, A., Richards, M.P., and Fox, S.C., eds. 2015. Archaeodiet in the Greek World: Dietary Reconstruction from Stable Isotope Analysis. Princeton.Google Scholar
Peirce, S. 1998. “Visual Language and Concepts of Cult on the ‘Lenaia Vases.’” Classical Antiquity 17: 5995.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Rawson, B., ed. 2011. A Companion to Families in the Greek and Roman World. Malden, MA.Google Scholar
Rotroff, S., and Oakley, J.. 1992. Debris from a Public Dining Place in the Athenian Agora. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steiner, A. 2002. “Private and Public: Links Between Symposion and Syssition in Fifth Century Athens.” Classical Antiquity 21: 347390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Steiner, A. 2018. “Measure for Measure: Fifth Century Public Dining at the Tholos in Athens.” In Feasting and Polis Institutions, ed. Van den Eijnde, F. et al., Leiden, 205232.Google Scholar
Topper, K. 2012. The Imagery of the Athenian Symposium. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Van Alfen, P. 2016. “Aegean and Levantine Trade, 600–300 bce: Commodities, Consumers, and the Problem of Autarkia.” In The Ancient Greek Economy: Markets, Households, and City-States, ed. Harris, E. et al., Cambridge, 277298.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Van den Eijnde, F., Blok, J., and Strootman, R., eds. 2018. Feasting and Polis Institutions. Leiden.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wilkins, J. 2000. The Boastful Chef: The Discourse of Food in Ancient Greek Comedy. Oxford.Google Scholar
Wilkins, J., and Nadeau, R.. 2015. A Companion to Food in the Ancient World. Chichester.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Wycherley, R.E. 1957. Literary and Epigraphical Testimonia. Agora 3. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Further Reading

The bibliography on ancient Greek sexual behavior is vast. Halperin et al. 1990 provides the standard constructionist view. Robson 2013 gives a readable and insightful overview, along with Ormand 2018, which also considers Roman sexual practices. The collections of Masterson, Rabinowitz, and Robson 2015 and Hubbard 2013 include excellent essays on a wide range of topics. The best recent work on the archaeological remains for Athenian sex work is the collection of Glazebrook and Tsakirgis 2016 (with references to earlier work). For perceptive essays on vases and sculpture, see the collection of Cohen 2000. Kilmer 1993 is the standard work on Attic red-figure erotica.

Bibliography

Additional resources to accompany this chapter can be found at: www.cambridge.org/NeilsRogers

Burnett, A. 2012. “Brothels, Boys, and the Athenian Adonia.” Arethusa 45: 177194.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Cohen, B., ed. 2000. Not the Classical Ideal: Athens and the Construction of the Other in Greek Art. Leiden.Google Scholar
Cox, C.A. 1998. Household Interests: Property, Marriage Strategies, and Family Dynamics in Ancient Athens. Princeton.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Corner, S. 2011. “Bringing the Outside In: The Andron as Brothel and the Symposium’s Civic Sexuality.” In Greek Prostitutes in the Ancient Mediterranean, 800 bce–200 ce, eds. Glazebrook, A. and Henry, M., Madison, 6085.Google Scholar
Davidson, J.N. 1998. Courtesans and Fishcakes: The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens. New York.Google Scholar
Glazebrook, A. 2011. “Porneion: Prostitution in Athenian Civic Space.” In Greek Prostitutes in the Ancient Mediterranean, 800 bce–200 ce, eds. Glazebrook, A. and Henry, M., Madison, 3459.Google Scholar
Glazebrook, A., and Tsakirgis, B., eds. 2016. Houses of Ill Repute: The Archaeology of Brothels, Houses, and Taverns in the Greek World. Philadelphia.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Goldhill, S. 2015. “Is There a History of Prostitution?” In Sex in Antiquity, eds. Masterson, M. et al., London, 179197.Google Scholar
Halperin, D.M., et al., eds. 1990. Before Sexuality: The Construction of Erotic Experience in the Ancient Greek World. Princeton.Google Scholar
Hubbard, T., ed. 2013. A Companion to Greek and Roman Sexualities. Malden, MA.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kamen, D. 2018. “The Consequences of Laughter in in Aeschines’ Against Timarchos.” Archimede 5: 4956.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Kilmer, M. 1993. Greek Erotica on Attic Red-Figure Vases. London.Google Scholar
Knigge, U. 2005. Der Bau Z. Kerameikos 17. Munich.Google Scholar
Kurke, L. 1999. Coins, Bodies, Games, and Gold: The Politics of Meaning in Archaic Greece. Princeton.Google Scholar
Lear, A., and Cantarella, E.. 2008. Images of Ancient Greek Pederasty. New York.Google Scholar
Masterson, M., Rabinowitz, N.S., and Robson, J., eds. 2015. Sex in Antiquity. London.Google Scholar
Neils, J. 2000. “Others within the Other: An Intimate Look at Hetairai and Maenads.” In Not the Classical Ideal: Athens and the Construction of the Other in Greek Art, ed. Cohen, B.. Leiden, 203226.Google Scholar
Nevett, L.C. 1999. House and Society in the Ancient Greek World. Cambridge.Google Scholar
Ormand, K. 2018. Controlling Desires: Sexuality in Ancient Greece and Rome. Revised edn. Austin.Google Scholar
Patterson, C. 1990. “Those Athenian Bastards.” Classical Antiquity 9: 4073.CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
Robson, J. 2013. Sex and Sexuality in Classical Athens. Edinburgh.Google Scholar

Save book to Kindle

To save this book to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Available formats
×

Save book to Dropbox

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Available formats
×

Save book to Google Drive

To save content items to your account, please confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Available formats
×