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4 - Catholic Worship

from Part II - Catholic Life and Culture

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  27 May 2021

Margaret M. McGuinness
Affiliation:
La Salle University, Philadelphia
Thomas F. Rzeznik
Affiliation:
Seton Hall University, New Jersey
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Summary

Describing American Catholic worship demands grappling with the broad expanse of peoples and places that have experienced the Catholic faith between the moment of the first Mass, celebrated by globe-trotting Spanish explorers in 1494, and Mass in the twenty-first century, when the first American-born pope, Francis, assumed leadership of the global church. Yet, American Catholic worship asks that we look at far more than formal ritual experiences such as the Mass, the Divine Office, or the sacraments. For much of American Catholic history, a rich panoply of devotions to Mary, Jesus, the saints, and the Blessed Sacrament played a major, if not central, role in supporting and sustaining Catholic identity on the American continent – a role that would not be challenged until liturgical renewal advocates began to question the relationship of popular piety and formal liturgical prayer in the second quarter of the twentieth century.

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Chapter
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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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References

Further Reading

Chinnici, Joseph P., “Reception of Vatican II in the United States,” Theological Studies 64, no. 3 (2003): 461494.Google Scholar
Dougherty, Joseph, From Altar-Throne to Table: The Campaign for Frequent Holy Communion in the Catholic Church. Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press, 2010.Google Scholar
Francis, Mark R., Shape a Circle Ever Wider: Liturgical Inculturation in the United States. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2000.Google Scholar
Harmon, Katharine E., “Learning Your Catholic Language: Attitudes and Approaches to Latin and Vernacular in the United States’ Liturgical Movement,” Worship 87, no. 4 (2013): 309337.Google Scholar
McGuinness, Margaret M., “Let Us Go to the Altar: American Catholics and the Eucharist, 1926–1975,” in Habits of Devotion: Catholic Religious Practice in Twentieth-Century America, ed. O’Toole, James. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2004, 187235.Google Scholar
Mitchell, Nathan D., Cult and Controversy: The Worship of the Eucharist Outside Mass. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 1982.Google Scholar
Taves, Ann, The Household of Faith: Roman Catholic Devotions in Mid-Nineteenth-Century America. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 1986.Google Scholar
Turner, Paul, Whose Mass Is It? Why People Care So Much about Catholic Liturgy. Collegeville, MN: Liturgical Press, 2015.Google Scholar

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