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Chapter 4 - Unmet Needs of Older Persons with and Without Depression in Residential Homes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 June 2021

Juanita Hoe
Affiliation:
City, University of London
Martin Orrell
Affiliation:
University of Nottingham
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Summary

Depression is a common disorder in older people and is known to be associated with adverse outcomes such as reduced quality of life and increased morbidity and mortality.1,2 Among older people in primary care, the prognosis of late-life depression is poor.3 The prevalence for major depression in residential homes is estimated to be between 6% and 11% and around 30% for depressive symptoms.4

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Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Print publication year: 2021

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